Tag: 南京夜生活


OSU freshman forward Mason Jobst (26) during a game against Michigan on March 6 at Nationwide Arena. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorIn a battle of top-15 teams, the No. 12 Ohio State men’s hockey team (13-7-6, 4-5-1-1) hosts No. 5 Minnesota for two home conference clashes this weekend.The Golden Gophers (17-7-2, 8-2-0-0) enter the series as the nation’s fourth-ranked offense with almost four goals per game, and rank seventh in power play offense. OSU and Minnesota split two games back on Dec. 3 and 4 — a 5-3 OSU loss on Friday night and an 8-3 win the next day. Since then, however, coach Don Lucia’s squad has won 10 of its last 12 games, and are on a three-game win streak that included a sweep of No. 10 Penn State last weekend.Between the two units, either side is ranked as one of the nation’s top-five offenses.Scarlet and Gray associate head coach Mark Strobel said the Gophers are a different team than 10 weeks ago that presents a lethal offense year in and year out. Moreover, Strobel said the Buckeyes have the capability to sweep this weekend’s game, but the wins will go to the team that executes and competes for all three periods. “It’s going to be a skating game, and for us, we have to take away time and space, and frustrate them with playing the body,” Strobel said. “For us, it’s a want, and it’s the ability to compete for 60 minutes and not just 20.”On the other side, OSU has had a difficult time keeping its opponent off the scoreboard in the first period of games as of late. The Buckeyes fell behind 2-0 and 1-0 in the first period of games against Wisconsin on Jan. 26 and 28, as well as 2-0 and 3-2 deficits in the first 20 minutes of both games at Michigan last weekend.In light of the slow starts, sophomore forward Mason Jobst said making sure the team does not come out flat has been a big emphasis this week in order to not give opponents the opportunity to take advantage of the game early on. Making adjustments mid-game will be key to success in this series.“We’ve got to change it,” Jobst said. “We can’t afford to keep digging (ourselves into) big holes. We can’t get out of them.”With just 10 games left, the Scarlet and Gray sit in fourth place in the Big Ten standings with 14 points — 10 behind the Golden Gophers, who are in a tie at the top with No. 17 Wisconsin.As the final stretch of the season begins with six conference points on the line this weekend, Strobel said the team’s focus needs to be set on playing “Buckeye hockey” by getting pucks deep, pressuring the defense and dictating the pace of play — starting with the first game Friday night.“Every weekend is a big series … we have to win hockey games,” Strobel said. “We can’t let points go south anymore. We have to stop the bleeding, if you will, and for us, it’s going to be Friday night, come eight o’clock, that we have to take our game to Minnesota.”Puck drop is slated for 8 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center both Friday and Saturday night. read more


first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, November 21, 2017 – Nassau – The Bahamas Department of Labour, in a strategic alliance with the Ministry of National Security is launching its first public awareness campaign with component two (2) of the Citizen Security and Justice Programme (CSJP), which is the component related to at-risk youth skills training.This programme would directly engage the Department of Labour’s Public Employment Services (PES) Unit by providing data from the surveys to help in the facilitation of job placement for the programme participants.   Specifically, the public awareness activities will be attached to the recruitment and application process for the upcoming soft skills and technical skills training during the first quarter of 2018.   The campaign is targeting the completion of 500 pre-surveys filled out by at-risk youth with an accompanying post-survey to be completed after the training.   These surveys, for practical purposes, will have a tri-part function of screening, application and a monitoring and evaluation tool.The completion of these surveys will not only provide pertinent data in the assessment of placement for unemployed persons, but also serves the purpose of meeting the Citizen Security and Justice Programme’s projected deliverables for its Annual Operation Plan for 2017.The launch of the public awareness campaign, to be held at the Department of Labour’s Rosetta Street location will allow for the general public and the media to be informed of the Citizen Security and Justice Programme’s purpose, the process for applying and details on the planned training sessions.The projected launch date for the Citizen Security and Justice Programme is Monday, November 27th, 2017. Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more


first_img Register Now » 2 min read October 21, 2014 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globalcenter_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Warning: This is not science fiction. The U.S. Military is making plans to inject people’s brains with artificially intelligent nanobots that will give them awesome, Wolverine-like powers to heal themselves.Yes, this sounds like a crock of futuristic crazysauce from the pages of a Marvel Comics thriller, but this is for real.DARPA, the American government’s controversial, ultra high-tech military gadget and research lab, is developing wireless, “ultra-miniaturized” and injectable electronic devices that could eventually — and quite literally — get on people’s nerves. Luckily only in ways that heal their pain and keep them healthy. Or so the Department of Defense-funded agency says.Related: Self-Healing Phones? Try Roads That Fix Themselves.The agency remains mum on exactly how the devices will be injected, other than to say that they “would require only minimally invasive insertion producers such as injectable delivery through a needle.”The five-year, $80 million government bankrolled neuroprosthetic research program is fittingly called the Electrical Prescriptions initiative. But you can call it ElecRx (pronounced electrics) for short. It’s part of President Obama’s BRAIN campaign to help “warfighters and civilians suffering from traumatic injury and neuropsychiatric illness.”DARPA says the goal of the project is to create “new, high-precision, minimally invasive technologies for modulating nerve circuits to restore and maintain human health.” Translated, the hope is that the agency’s tiny “intelligent pacemaker” implants — as miniscule as individual nerve fibers — will replace medications. They might also render obsolete the bulky, card deck-sized surgical brain implants already in use today to treat things like depression, epilepsy, Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.  Related: Want to Run Faster? This Old-School Concept Might Hold the Answer. Functioning in a seamless, “closed-loop system,” the government’s smart nano doohickeys would act like mini remote controls that automatically monitor and regulate the body’s peripheral nervous system 24/7. They would constantly adjust the users’ internal organs and how they respond to injury, infection and other imbalances.Yep, the little doodads could one day help people heal themselves. Let’s just hope that’s the only thing they’re used for (insert skeptical, mind-control comment here).Related: FDA Approves First Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Armlast_img read more


first_imgSeptember 21, 2005The Double Cantilever Bridge model is already in Rome, but we want to continue the story of its restoration. For previous reports on this restoration see postings from 8/19 and 8/26. This model was originally cast by Paolo Soleri at Cosanti in the 1960’s.The Double Cantilever Bridge model is already in Rome, but we want to continue the story of its restoration. For previous reports on this restoration see postings from 8/19 and 8/26. This model was originally cast by Paolo Soleri at Cosanti in the 1960’s. Planning and Construction Intern Kim Young Soo files details on a restored part of the bridge. [Photo & text: sa] A plaster cast of the top support of the bridge stand is inserted into the connecting cavity at the bottom of the bridge. A plaster bandage support is wrapped around the cast. [Photo & text: sa] The support plaster bandage has set. [Photo & text: sa]center_img Workshop participant Joseph Murray paints the inside of the cavity with soap. More on restoration of this model on 9/23. [Photo & text: sa]last_img read more