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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [dropcap]A[/dropcap]16-year-old Muslim American girl who frequently gets taunted for her religious beliefs. A son of Mexican immigrants who’s been discriminated against all his life. A father of two who has never attended a protest before but wanted to introduce his kids to the political process.These were some of the diverse faces of the several hundred protestors who demonstrated outside GOP presidential frontrunner Donald Trump’s rally at Grumman Studios in Bethpage Wednesday night.Standing for several hours just beyond the entrance to Trump’s much-ballyhooed campaign stop, incensed protesters waved signs amid bone-chilling temperatures, decrying what many perceive to be Islamophobic, racist and misogynistic comments from the delegate-leading Republican hopeful.“No more room for hate, America is great!” protesters chanted from where they were sequestered, as pro-Trump Long Islanders made their way to the rally one day after their top pick for the White House suffered a brutal defeat to U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tx) in Wisconsin.“Trump’s a fascist!” they screamed in a rhythm that mimicked a “Let’s Go Yankees!” chant.“Hey-hey, ho-ho, hateful Trump has got to go!” the bundled bodies billowed as the evening sky melted to black.Protesters began huddling around 4 p.m., occupying a space across the street from Grumman Studios’ entrance dubbed the “Free Speech Zone” by local law enforcement authorities, which attracted an odd mix of pro-Trump followers and his many detractors. Some business savvy supporters sold Trump apparel—hats, shirts, and buttons—beside a food truck vendor advertising Halal meat.Busloads of Trump supporters responded to some of the jeers with a flash of their middle finger—a greeting even some children riding on board took part in.The protest was mostly peaceful until a large group of Trump fans who had failed to enter the Grumman Studios because the venue was at full capacity started a counter-protest that prompted an hours-long standoff under the watchful eye of Nassau County police officers in riot gear and cops mounted on horseback.Nassau County police officers in riot gear stand between Donald Trump protesters and the GOP frontrunner’s fans.In order to maintain the peace, officers separated the rival groups, prompting chants of “Build that wall!” from Trump supporters, who ironically were the ones being blocked off.The Trump group yelled “White Lives Matter,!” recommended that protesters “Get a job,” and chanted, “Leave this country!”They also took on the two Democrats vying for their party’s nomination. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt), a self-proclaimed Democratic socialist, was dubbed a “Communist,” and Hillary Clinton, the Democratic frontrunner, was chided for perceived lies she supposedly spewed.“We do our jobs, we come home, we want to watch some Netflix and binge on some brownies.”When a Trump supporter condemned Clinton for her untruths, someone on the other side of the rally responded, “Fuck you, we don’t like her, either.”At one point, both sides engaged in dueling “U-S-A” chants, as if to demonstrate one side was more patriotic than the other.So went the first anti-Trump demonstration on Long Island in 2016: High school insults were traded, bravado did not manifest into much of substance, and demonstrators chanted until their vocal chords gave out.Aside from the broadsides exchanged by both sides, protester after protester said they had deep misgivings with the GOP favorite and were uncomfortable with some of his remarks he’s made on the campaign trail about Muslims, Mexicans and women.Mahira Siddiqi, a mother of three from Hicksville, felt compelled to attend Wednesday’s rally because of rampant Islamophobia careening through the media.“I think a lot of the people who are out here don’t really know any Muslims that closely, and I think if they took the time to talk to some of us they would realize that we’re just like them,” Siddiqi told the Press.“We do our jobs, we come home, we want to watch some Netflix and binge on some brownies,” she added. “And we want to raise our kids in a peaceful society, and we want our kids to have the same opportunities that we did. And for most of us, we were born here, so this is home. This is it.”Siddiqi lamented that both her 11- and 8-year-old are old enough to understand to some degree that anti-Islam sentiment is roiling America today.She said she tries to shield them from the rhetoric because “it just hurts my heart for them to have to feel that.” But she felt compelled to take her place in Bethpage.“Because the level of hate has just gotten so much, it’s become necessary for people who maybe normally would not go out and be activists to do so,” she said.A business-savy Long Islander selling Donald Trump apparel outside his rally in Bethpage. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)As if on cue, Jeff Zilberstein, 42, of East Islip was sauntering around the barricaded area with his 7-year-old daughter perched atop his shoulders.It was the first time Zilberstein ever attended a protest. He decided to make it a family affair, bringing along his wife and two kids.“I think that they need to understand what the political process is all about. I’ve never done this before,” Zilberstein said. “You can agree to disagree about a lot of things, but I have a hard time agreeing to disagree about Trump.”To him, the bombastic reality TV star and businessman’s being in the race “was a joke to begin with—and he’s not a joke anymore,” he said.Benjetta Miller of Bay Shore was standing under a tree holding a “Stand Against Islamophobia” sign.Miller, a Sanders supporter who is not eligible to vote in the state’s April 19 primary because New York’s closed primary rules don’t allow registered Independents to cast a ballot, said she’d vote for Clinton in the general election if it came down to it.“There’s just no room in our country, in our government, for a Donald Trump,” she said.The Ahmed family from Woodmere would agree.Sarfaraz Ahmed, his wife and daughter, Yursa, decided to attend the rally to protest what they consider racist remarks espoused by Trump, and because their family has been the victim of Islamophobic comments.“Our kids go to school, and they’ve been harassed. They’ve been called names because we wear different clothes,” said Sarafarz, adding that his children have been branded “terrorists” by bullies.“We are here for 40 years—my brother came [in] 1973,” added the Pakistani immigrant. “All the kids were born here. Grew up here. Went to school here.”His 16-year-old daughter Yursa, who attends private school, expressed her disappointment that people would judge an entire religion based on the acts of a select few.“It’s like a classroom. When one kid messes up, the whole class doesn’t have recess,” said Yursa, who has been taunted by people when she goes into New York City. “Why do we have to suffer if someone else messed up?”The Ahmed family from Woodmere lamented anti-Muslim sentiment in America today. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)Muslims aren’t the only ones who felt compelled to speak out.“The reason I feel like joining is because a lot of people of my skin complexion would rather hold their silence than stand up and let their voices be heard,” said 22-year-old Key Martinez of North Bellmore. “I’m not an illegal immigrant, but my family are, so I’m here for them.”Martinez has specifically objected to Trump’s proposal to have Mexico build a wall to prevent people crossing America’s southern border.If his family hadn’t come more than 25 years ago, he’d never have the opportunities now offered to him.“I’ve been discriminated all of my life,” said Martinez, who attends Nassau Community College where he also works. “This is the first time I get to stand up for that.”Martinez summed up what many other people in the crowd said they have been feeling as they’ve watched Trump tour the country while promising to make America great by banning Muslims, putting the Muslims that are here in databases, keeping Mexicans out, punishing women for abortions if they’re deemed illegal (before he backtracked), and lessening America’s role militarily by suggesting countries like Japan and South Korea should develop nuclear bombs to defend themselves.“He is prejudice,” Martinez said, “and there’s no way of denying that.”last_img read more


first_imgOAKLAND — Matt Olson’s batting stance is menacing. His 6-foot-5 frame towers over the 17-inch rubber pentagon at his white-cleated feet. His lumber isn’t perched readily at his shoulder, but expectantly and loosely just inches from the strike zone.Olson’s game matches his batter’s box presence at this point. It’s safe to expect that Olson’s at bats will spawn something spectacular. With a little more than a week remaining in the regular season — a wild card game looking promising — Olson’s bat …last_img


first_imgThe first 482 houses in the initial phase at Cornubia have been finished and handed over to residents. (Image: GCIS)• Karen PetersenHuman Settlements ExecutiveTongaat [email protected] PhilipThe day that Vusi Shabangu was handed the keys to his new home was the best day of his life. Early in March he moved into a two-bedroom house in the Cornubia housing development outside Durban, a place where a single room was larger than the shack he had called home.In 1995, excited by a new democracy and the promise of opportunity, Shabangu moved from rural KwaZulu-Natal to Durban in search of a better life. For almost two decades he worked as an itinerant labourer, moving from one backyard room to a shack in one of the informal settlements that ring eThekwini.It does not matter to Shabangu that he is resident in a landmark development; all that matters to me are the keys in his hands. Along with the keys, he gets to enjoy the parks and recreation, and communal hall as well. He will grow to appreciate the fact that Cornubia – which will be renamed on April 1 by President Jacob Zuma when he hands over keys to the next bunch of residents – is designed as a community with schools, clinics, recreational and shopping facilities. Work opportunities are also easily reached by the new mass transit routes that are part and parcel of the infrastructure improvements included in the design.Cornubia is being created by the eThekwini Municipality and agriculture giant Tongaat Hulett. Once completed – expected to be in 20 years – the mixed-use development of housing, commercial and industrial sites will change the skyline between King Shaka International Airport and Umhlanga.Karen Petersen, the human settlement executive at Tongaat Hulett, explains that Cornubia will provide over 24 000 residential units, catering for all races, across income bands. More than just a housing development, the vision is to provide residents with access to employment and retail opportunities as well. “By offering a safe and secure environment, traffic accessibility, and access to other urban amenities and services, Cornubia’s mixed-use development will provide a place for all residents to live, work and play.”Communal spacesBut its importance extends beyond the amenities. She says that Cornubia puts an end to the stereotype that social housing is simply about putting a roof over someone’s head. The communal spaces are designed to encourage social interaction and create a sense of ownership and commitment to community. “There is a real social implication of poorly designed housing. If you don’t create places where people are proud to live, then you’re just reinforcing the idea that neither the building nor the tenant is worth the effort.”A key principle behind Cornubia is the integration of different income levels and a mix of freehold and rental housing. In line with international design concepts, provision has also been made for social infrastructure. “The planning was driven around the need for accessibility, so all facilities – schools, health and other social infrastructure – will be within a five-minute walk.” Human Settlements new focus includes ensuring the delivery of affordable housing in sustainable and habitable settlements. (Image: GCIS)Social and environmental sustainability are important considerations for Tongaat Hulett, and the buildings going up in the commercial and industrial sections are designed to be environmentally sensitive, and totally green where possible. “There are, however, financial limitations which restrict major green interventions in the subsidised housing components of the project. However, Tongaat Hulett where appropriate is encouraging the adoption of these principles. Unfortunately, for now, this will in all likelihood only take place in the higher intensity commercial/mixed-use areas like Cornubia Town Centre,” Petersen says.By the time the R24-billion site is completed in 2030, the 1 200ha property will consist of 24 000 housing units, of which 15 000 will be low cost homes; there will be 2 million square metres of commercial space and an 80ha industrial development. The construction phase will create up to 15 000 new jobs, while the completed development will create space for about 48 000 permanent retail and industrial jobs. Residents will contribute about R300-million in rates to the eThekwini coffers and a further R2.1-billion in VAT receipts for the national fiscus.Cornubia is important for the potential benefits it will create in housing, employment and economic opportunity. It represents a shift in thinking in the housing programmes of local and national housing departments and is proving to a benchmark for future development in South Africa.Human settlementsHuman Settlements Minister Connie September explains: “We have shifted from housing to human settlements. We now have an integrated approach that includes better spatial planning. Today we want to build communities planned around water and sanitation, with schools and recreation facilities in close proximity, and economic opportunities close by. We want to plant trees.”To promote the creation of vibrant communities that have access to adequate social and economic facilities, the government agreed that the former Department of Housing should have its mandate widened to facilitate sustainable human settlements. In addition to housing, the new mandate includes integrated provision of services, social facilities and economic opportunities.September says that her department is committed to addressing the legacy of spatial poverty by developing human settlements in well-located land with sufficient social and economic opportunities. “This will be a key priority of the department in the future. In simple, we are striving to create new settlements that are conducive for human habitation and growth.”Taking a leaf from the National Treasury’s successful public-private partnership unit, the department has also been more receptive to working with the private sector when building new housing.Petersen says Tongaat Hulett refers to Cornubia as “a joint initiative or collaboration between public and private sector partners”. It is built on land acquired from Hulett at below market rates with the understanding that it will be used for low income housing.Housing backlogWhen negotiations began for a new political dispensation in South Africa, there was a backlog of 1.3 million homes. Each year, the demand has grown by a further 200 000 with just 50 000 new homes being built to meet the demand.From 1994 onwards, through the Reconstruction and Development Programme, the new administration began building homes at a rapid pace. To date, 2.68 million homes have been built, providing accommodation to 12.5 million South Africans for the first time.Critics of the RDP build have slated the poor build quality of these houses. Their biggest complaint though, has been aesthetic; RDP homes resemble the building programmes of the apartheid government – bleak, massive settlements far away from work opportunities, decent public transport and retailers.Containing the growing backlog while meeting existing demand meant “good design” and “communities” were concepts that were not considered. However, in the last few years there has been a growing recognition that it’s not just houses that need to be built, but communities and places where people want to live.Cornubia is one of four projects nationally that signal this shift in the way the Department of Human Settlements views development. It was one of the first when construction began in March 2012, in line with the department’s Breaking New Ground policy. Nationally there are two other projects that are close to receiving the first group of new residents.In the Waterberg District, the Lephalale Project’s 29 709 houses are being built adjacent to a retail and commercial precinct. It has been fast-tracked to deal with a housing backlog aggravated by the influx of workers to the Medupi Power Station, which is 21 kilometres away.The Khutsong Project in Merafong has been fast-tracked to move 25 000 households living on geographically unstable dolomitic land. Khutsong is a community being designed and built from the ground up and will include subsidised housing, retail and industrial sites as well as social and educational amenities, September explains. “These new projects are beginning to reshape the spatial legacy of apartheid into the non-racial integrated settlements that we dreamed of.”last_img read more


first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 26 May 2015 – Charles Hubert James Primary School and Adelaide Oemler Primary School on North Caicos, Marjorie Basden and Iris Stubbs in South Caicos and Ianthe Pratt Primary School in Providencial​es are the five schools to benefit from Grace Bay Club Foundation’s 3rd annual Fundraiser set for this Friday, May 29th. ​​​Directors of the GBRC invite the public to attend the initiative ​which was first launched by the organization in 2009 to help in t​he advancement of school projects. There is a $50 dollar cover charge to enter the event which is being held at the Grace Bay Club resort – attendees will receive a signature drink and hors d’oeuvres. Thousands of dollars in prizes will auctioned off with the featured prize being round trip ticket to New York for two on Jet Blue, two night stay in a Junior Suite at the Knickerbocker Hotel in New York and Two Tickets (2) in a private suite to Billy Joel Concert in New York beginning in August in Madison Square Garden. Dr. Carlton Mills of the Grace Bay Club Community Foundation says an estimated half a million dollars has been raised for schools in North Caicos, Providenciales and South Caicos through various programs over the years. Related Items:Adelaide Oemler Primary School, Charles Hubert James Primary School, grace bay club community foundation, Ianthe Pratt Primary School, Iris Stubbs, marjorie basden, south caicos Recommended for you South Caicos student new Junior Tourism Minister for TCI Teen dies mysteriously in South Caicos, Police investigate State of Emergency Declared for South Caicoslast_img read more


first_imgRangers Football Club manager Steven Gerrard has hammered his team’s defenders after their horror outing against Spartak Moscow on Thursday.The Gers took the lead three times in Moscow, but a woeful second-half display handed them their first UEFA Europa League defeat of the season.The Scottish Premiership club were on a high when first-half strikes from Glenn Middleton, Daniel Candeias and an own-goal from Roman Eremenko gave them a 3-2 advantage.But shocking defensive lapses, especially in the second half, allowed Spartak to seize control for a 4-3 win, as they blew Group G wide open.Gerrard’s side seat third in their group behind Spartak and Villarreal, but host the Spanish club on match day 5 as they look to secure qualification for the second round.However, the former Liverpool youth team coach refused to spare his ropey rear-guard and knows more lamentable defending in their next two group games will cost them any shot at the last 32.Steven Gerrard, Michael OwenOwen reveals why Liverpool didn’t offer Gerrard a new contract Manuel R. Medina – September 6, 2019 According to Owen, the Reds wanted to sell Gerrard two years before he left the club and that’s why they didn’t offer him a contract renewal.He said, according to Express: “I’m very disappointed with the result. You saw two sides of our performance tonight. We attacked very well and were dangerous and countered bravely. We got our rewards and had control at half-time.“However, football is about levels and if you don’t do the basics well enough and defend properly, then high-level teams will normally punish you and that was the case here.“People who have had a lot of praise and who did really well to get us to this stage just didn’t do the basics well enough.“Normally, to come here and score three goals you get a result, but I’m bitterly disappointed with how we defended.”last_img read more


first_img Dan Plante, KUSI Newsroom April 2, 2018 FacebookTwitter Dan Plante, KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Vandals defaced a Planned Parenthood office in Pacific Beach with red paint in the second such incident at the clinic in less than two months, police said Monday.San Diego police were alerted to the damage just before 2:50 a.m. today at the Planned Parenthood Mission Bay Mimi Brien Health Center in the 4500 block of Mission Bay Drive, Officer Robert Heims said. A substance believed to be red paint was splashed across the front glass doors and windows of the clinic, which is in a three-story business complex at Mission Bay Drive and Bunker Hill Street.The same clinic was splattered with red paint in a nearly identical incident in mid-February.Police did not immediately have any suspects in the case, Heims said. Officers told dispatchers they were taking samples of the substance for testing, and 10News reported that police were seeking footage from two nearby surveillance cameras.Planned Parenthood clinics offer reproductive health care services such as sex education, birth control, emergency contraceptives, cancer screenings, abortions and pregnancy health. But the organization has come under attack — both verbal and physical — from abortion opponents.The most notable attack happened on Nov. 27, 2015, when a gunman entered a Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood clinic and killed three people, including a police officer, during a five-hour standoff. Robert Lewis Dear Jr., 59, has repeatedly confessed to the shooting in court and in interviews, though he’s been found incompetent for his prosecution to move forward.Dear has called himself a “warrior” for unborn children and said he was prompted in part by secretly recorded videos that appeared to show a high-level Planned Parenthood official detailing how the organization profits from aborted fetuses by selling the human tissue for medical testing.The unedited video showed a clearer picture of the conversation and showed Planned Parenthood offsets some costs by selling the tissue but does not make a profit. The two anti-abortion activists who secretly made the videos and others with Planned Parenthood employees have been charged by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra with 15 felony counts related to illegal recordings. Updated: 10:18 PM Posted: April 2, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News Planned Parenthood clinic vandalizedlast_img read more


first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The Alabama Military Stability Foundation is seeking feedback from firms and entities with knowledge and experience in fiscal impact analysis, economic development, defense contracting and/or business consulting to support its continuing defense supply chain assessment efforts.DOD’s Office of Economic Adjustment (OEA) provides grants to state and local governments to support projects meant to mitigate the impact of defense cuts. The Alabama Military Stability Foundation has been preliminarily approved to receive OEA funding to support a continuing effort to assess the Alabama defense supply chain while assisting defense contractors with diversification efforts. The Foundation would welcome your feedback regarding the proposed research methodology and any suggestions you may have regarding how we might be able to improve our approach to gathering this important information.Responses to this request must be received by the Foundation no later than Friday, Aug. 12 at 4 p.m. CST. Responses received after this deadline will not be considered.Questions may be directed to Lora McClendon, executive director, Alabama Military Stability Foundation, at [email protected] or (334) 245-4330. A copy of the full request for information is available here.last_img read more

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