Month: June 2021


first_imgTAGS: Leinster “In the Aviva Stadium game a week later we knew exactly what we had to do and we really fronted up, took the game to them and put in a good performance. There were a lot of supporters there and we owed it to them as well.“The Ulster game was a massive one for us (in the context of) getting us up the Magners League table and, like I said before about Clermont, it’s not an easy place to go and win up in Belfast. Conditions weren’t good and the crowd are very noisy, but again we stuck to our game-plan; we didn’t panic… did the simple stuff and thankfully came out on the right side of it.“The Academy really helped me, both physically and mentally, and it gave me a great insight into what the demands are to become a professional rugby player. The lads that have come through there recently like Dominic (Ryan) and Rhys (Ruddock) are on our heels now and it’s good to have that competition in the squad.“The likes of Eoin O’Malley and Fergus (McFadden) have been there for a while. Eoin was unlucky with injury for a time, while Fergus has been playing consistently for a while and taking any chances he has got. They’re all good lads, they all know what Leinster is about and they really want to win.“I think that this week we’re going to have to be very mentally strong. They’re going to come over here and try to beat us up, so we’re going to have to have our minds right and stick to the game-plan. It’s not a game to try anything fancy, we just have to try and win. You can’t have too many errors against these lads or else they’ll punish you.” Tullow wing forward Sean O’Brien has been named the Bank of Ireland Player of the Month for December.Sean received the most December votes from Leinster supporters who referenced his inspirational form against Scarlets at the beginning of the month, his try making performance in the ‘Fever in the Aviva’ against French side Clermont and the interprovincial derby with Ulster when he scored two tries, his first efforts in the Magners League this season.Commenting on his award, Sean reflected on the month’s games and on own his development in the Leinster Academy before turning his attention to Saturday’s game against Saracens.Sean O’Brien said: “It’s always nice to get this kind of award and to be recognised by the supporters is an honour and I’m absolutely delighted.“I remember the Scarlets game because we didn’t play that well, but we stuck in there and got the draw in the end. I suppose we were pleased that we didn’t lose the game, but we let ourselves down a little bit that day but we made up for it in the weeks to come.“We then went to play Clermont away and I still think that we could have won that game. We did well to get a point out of it because the crowd really gets in behind them and they’re a tough side. Looking back we were pleased to get the bonus point because it’s not easy to get anything from away games in the Heineken Cup, so we were happy. Voting is open for the January Bank of Ireland Leinster Rugby Player of the Month. To nominate a player from any or all of the games this month simply e-mail [email protected] telling us which player you want to vote for and why. Everyone who nominates a player is in with a chance to win a gift voucher. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


first_imgStarting XV:1.         Tony Woodcock (80)2.         Keven Mealamu (89)3.         Owen Franks (28)4.         Samuel Whitelock (22)5.         Brad Thorn (56)6.         Jerome Kaino (45)7.         Richie McCaw – captain (100)8.         Kieran Read (33)9.         Piri Weepu (53)10.       Colin Slade (9)11.       Sonny Bill Williams (11)12.       Ma’a Nonu (63)13.       Conrad Smith (52)14.       Cory Jane (28)15.       Mils Muliaina (99)Reserves:16.       Andrew Hore (59)17.       Ben Franks (14)18.       Ali Williams (70)19.       Victor Vito (11)20.       Jimmy Cowan (50)21.       Aaron Cruden (6)22.       Isaia Toeava (35)Number of Test caps in brackets Henry said: “There has been a real feeling of positive anticipation in the squad this week now that we have finished the Pool play rounds and are into the Quarterfinals. There is excitement amongst the team and we have had a good build–up on the North Shore this week, but there is also a realisation that this is sudden death, finals rugby.“We have the utmost respect for Argentina. They showed in their Pool matches, especially against England and Scotland, just how physical their game is, especially at set piece and at the breakdown.”The All Blacks and Argentina have played each other 13 times with 12 wins to the All Blacks and the one draw. The teams have met just once previously at the Rugby World Cup, at Wellington’s Athletic Park, in 1987. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 18: Mils Muliaina of the All Blacks helps out with a kicking competition during a New Zealand All Blacks IRB Rugby World Cup 2011 fan day at Pioneer Recreation & Sport Centre on September 18, 2011 in Christchurch, New Zealand. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images) Mils will join Richie McCaw as a Test CenturianAll Blacks Coach Graham Henry and his Assistant Coaches Steve Hansen and Wayne Smith have today announced the All Blacks team for their Quarterfinal match of the 2011 Rugby World Cup against Argentina at Eden Park, Auckland, on Sunday October 9.The highlight of the team announcement is the naming of 31–year–old fullback Mils Muliaina who will play his 100th Test.  He is just the second All Black to reach the milestone, following captain Richie McCaw’s 100th Test against France two weeks ago. Muliaina made his All Blacks debut in 2003, has captained the team in three Tests in 2009 and has scored 34 Test tries.All Blacks Coach Graham Henry, who has known Muliaina since his schoolboy days, today paid tribute to the fullback:  “I want to congratulate Mils on this outstanding achievement.  He is a special man and has been a world–class All Black for many years – the consummate professional really – as well as a very influential member of the All Blacks leadership group.”In other changes in the backline, Piri Weepu will start at halfback, Sonny Bill Williams comes onto the right wing, with three of the All Blacks backs – Zac Guildford (hamstring), Israel Dagg (thigh haematoma) and Richard Kahui (hamstring) – recovering from injuries, while Ma’a Nonu is back at second five–eighth.  Meanwhile, 2010 All Black Aaron Cruden, who was called into the All Blacks to replace the injured Daniel Carter, is on the bench.In the forwards, captain Richie McCaw returns to the starting XV after missing last week’s Test against Canada with a sore foot, while Keven Mealamu and Brad Thorn also return to the starting XV.last_img read more


first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fortified home: Clermont maintained their three-year unbeaten home record after defeating Leinster 15-12By Gavin MortimerIT’S THE half-way stage of the Heineken Cup and for the French clubs things are looking good. With three of the six pool matches gone, only Biarritz of the seven Top 14 teams look to have no hope of qualifying for the last eight. Their 22-14 defeat away at Connacht last weekend leaves the Basque outfit third in pool 6, nine points behind leaders Harlequins and three adrift of Connacht.In Pool 1, Racing Metro have dragged themselves back into contention with a 19-9 defeat of Edinburgh. The Parisians are now third, two points behind Munster and Saracens, and the Londoners must travel to the French capital for their penultimate group game.Pool Two could go down to the wire with Toulouse travelling to Welford Road on the weekend of January 19/20 to take on Leicester in the final group game. Following their easy victory over the Ospreys on Saturday, Toulouse are now three points clear of the Tigers who, like their French rivals, picked up a bonus point at the weekend by scoring five tries in their win over Treviso.Can Toulouse go all the way?Both Toulouse and Leicester hit the road this weekend with the reigning French champions expecting a frenetic encounter at the Liberty Stadium. “At Swansea, we’re going to be confronted by almost a sevens-style rugby,” said coach Guy Noves. “As a result, we’re probably going to field a very defensive team.” To that end it’s expected that captain Thierry Dusautoir will make his long-awaited return from injury on Saturday – two months after injuring his knee in the win over Treviso – and veteran hooker William Servat is also likely to start against the Welsh side. In Pool Four Castres have given themselves a glimmer of hope of qualifying for the last eight by winning 9-6 away at Glasgow. It wasn’t a pretty encounter, but the win means Castres are now in second spot, six points behind Ulster, whom they host in the last game of the group.  In the meantime Castres welcome Glasgow to France this weekend with confidence beginning to grow in the squad. “We’re starting to understand the Heineken Cup,” explained captain Matthias Rolland, whose side had to overcome wintery conditions in Scotland. “You have to know how to deal with distractions and stay concentrated. Two or three years ago, the team would have been destabilised, too used to its own comforts, but now we have the experience to deal with it.”Pool Five witnessed the clash of the Titans on Sunday with Clermont defending their three-year unbeaten home record against Leinster. It was the first defeat in 17 Heineken Cup matches for the Irishmen, a 15-12 loss that leaves them five points behind Clermont. But now Leinster get to welcome Clermont to Dublin on Sunday in a match that Julien Bonnaire expects to be ferocious. “We’ve got to maintain the same level of aggression and desire if we’re to get a result at the Aviva Stadium,” said the Clermont flanker, named man of the match after Sunday’s victory. SALFORD, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 08: Toulon player Sebastien Tillous-Borde makes a break during the Heineken Cup match between Sale Sharks and Toulon at Salford City Stadium on December 8, 2012 in Salford, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Sebastien Tillous-Borde making a run for itToulon are the runaway leaders in pool six with three wins from three, their latest victory coming at Sale on Saturday evening. Montpellier, five points behind and in second, managed their first away win in two seasons of Heineken Cup rugby after beating Cardiff 35-24 on the road, and coach Fabien Galthie believes his side are now adjusting to the demands of the competition. “To put 35 points on Cardiff is fantastic,” he said. “Montpellier is a young club where everything is still to be written.”As for Toulon, they won ugly in Sale but it was a victory that all but seals their place in the last eight. This weekend they host the Sharks in the return fixture, and next month Cardiff must travel to the Cote d’Azur. Win both of those games and Toulon are guaranteed of finishing top of their pool regardless of the outcome of their last match away in Montpellier.last_img read more


first_img Everything was supposed to be different this year, no more ‘one rule for me and another for you’.Yet one week into the World Cup we’re already seeing tier two nations having to overcome impossible schedules.While Brett Gosper claims that the all teams have been treated equally unlike four years ago, there still appears to be a clear disparity between the big teams and the rest.The reason for that is there are clearly different circumstances when it comes to four-day turnarounds.For the likes of France and New Zealand, a second game against Romania and Namibia respectively is not too tough an obstacle, with the depth to cope and more importantly, a lower ranked opposition.However Japan, Romania and Fiji have all been handed short turnarounds while playing the top two teams in their pools.The Japanese followed their historic win over South Africa with a clash against second seeds Scotland, Romania will face France then Ireland, while Fiji opened the tournament against England before taking on Australia (and let’s not even get started on playing Wales in Cardiff!) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Japan players look dejected during the 2015 Rugby World Cup Pool B match between Scotland and Japan at Kingsholm The disparity in scheduling between the big teams and the smaller teams is clear to see, with Japan, Romania and Fiji handed short turnarounds between gamescenter_img It’s impossible to ask these tier two sides to perform at their best in back-to-back games, and as Japan showed against Scotland, they inevitably run out of gas against fresher opposition.Romania have already as good as admitted that they will be forced to put out a second string side against Ireland on Sunday.“My biggest fear is that we will be competitive (against France) and then might crumble in the second because of the four day gap. Everything is stacked so heavily against us,” explained Romania boss Lynn Howells.While in that group it might not make a difference, with the group winner likely to come down to the clash between France and Ireland, there are others where it could prove crucial.Scotland playing a tired Japan picked up a maximum five points at Kingsholm, something that might not have happened against a fresher team. The same could prove the case with Australia taking on a jaded Fiji team, whereas the Fijians will have much more time to prepare for Wales, who will be coming off a tough game against England four days earlier.Of course the team who have it easiest are England, with a week between all of their games, it obviously pays to host the tournament!last_img read more


first_img TAGS: Connacht Green machine: Ciaran Gaffney on his way to a try. (Photo: Inpho) RW Verdict: His second U20 World Championship didn’t go as well as his first, as Ireland slipped from fourth to seventh. But this wing/full-back has a very bright future, being quick, strong and excellent under the high ball.First published in the August 2015 edition of Rugby World magazine. When did you start playing rugby?My dad, John, is a coach at Galwegians and I used to go to training with him every Saturday. He convinced me to join in with the U6s when I was four. I remember being a bit scared, butI loved it and did it every week.Have you played in different positions?I was an out-half until the Ireland Schools U18 coach Noel McNamara advised I move back to centre/wing and I suggested it to Nigel Carolan at Connacht Academy.Who has had a big influence on you?Nigel at Connacht, Ambrose Conboy at school and Ian O’Brien, who coached me all the way through the age groups with Galwegians. He was the father of last year’s Ireland U20 captain Sean O’Brien, but sadly he died a couple of years ago.When did you join Connacht?I was in the development squad from the U15s and when I left school I joined the sub academy, then the full academy last season. I still play for Galwegians when I can though.What involvement have you had with Ireland?I played the FIRA U18 tournament, then Ireland U19, then last year’s U20 World Cup a year young. It is a gruelling tournament, with five games in three weeks. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Date of birth 6 May 1995. Country Ireland What are your aims for next season?I will still be on an academy contract but I would love to progress into the senior squad at Connacht. There could be opportunities with the World Cup happening.last_img read more


first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Animated: Maro Itoje is always very vocal on the pitch It is something that winds some people up – players celebrating a scrum penalty, a turnover, even forcing a knock-on. Take the British & Irish Lions’ loss to the Blues on Wednesday. After the game Maro Itoje came in for considerable stick on social media due to his vociferous celebrating of a penalty being awarded to his side at the breakdown on the 72nd minute. He drew some ire, alright.It is interesting to ask: what is your view on it? Had the Lions – who have ostensibly fielded two teams that need something, anything to bond over – won, the view of some critics may have been very different. Perhaps you see it as petulant, regardless of the situation. But not all players are the same.It is interesting to contrast two opposing approaches on the pitch. Neither or both are right, depending on personal taste. Up first talking purely about his own habits is Crusaders prop Owen Franks, who will start against the Lions tomorrow and who was named in the All Blacks squad for the Test series.Reserved guy: Owen Franks keeps his cheering to a minimum“If I’m right there I will (celebrate a try),” the Kiwi tighthead said yesterday. “But usually I just want to get back there and get my breath back! I’m definitely not one to celebrate over the top most of the time. If I’m not right there I’ll just waddle back and get ready for the next play.“Hell yeah (succeeding still means a lot). Not so much early in games, when you know you’ve got so much ahead, but you know, those crucial moments like our drop kick on the weekend, that’s a pretty awesome buzz.”What Franks is referencing there is the Crusaders’ last-gasp drop-goal win over the Highlanders last week. It was a special, unexpected moment for a team that is yet to be beaten this season in Super Rugby.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREYou may think ‘I will be as stoic as Franks, any time, anywhere.’ Fair enough. But there is another approach too. Here is what Lions front-rower Jamie George had to say when asked about Itoje’s back-slapping. Maro Itoje got stick for celebrating a penalty award for the Lions against the Blues, but is it worth worrying about? center_img “The example you are talking about, we were defending for a large part of the game and at Saracens we are told to celebrate the small victories.“If you watch any of our games we often celebrate if we get a turnover, because we want to celebrate the effort of the players around us, we are putting in a huge amount of effort trying to get the ball back. It was a refereeing decision but it was off the back of all the work that our team-mates had done.”It’s not a cut and dry thing, is it. Certainly the Saracens fans would be more appreciative of moments like this, but who’s to say even a dry performer can’t get caught out.Celebrating Saracen: Jamie George supports Maro Itoje celebratingGeorge continues: “Maro brings a huge amount of energy to everyone that is around him and him celebrating just shows that he cares. It is all intrinsic with him, he just cares about the team and when he reacts like that it lifts everyone around him. If you look at a lot of the English guys and Saracens we are all very similar in that respect.“We care for the jersey, we care for our families and those are the people we are representing when we go on the field. Maro is a very proud person, I know that, that is probably why he reacted as he did and I don’t see any issue with that. “I think it is a huge positive, I have been coached since I was 14 to celebrate stuff like that and I don’t think I am going to change anytime soon.”No two situations are the same, clearly. What gets people’s backs up, is when it spills over into histrionics. Rugby is a game in need of balance in terms of play. Are you willing to allow a little emotion every once in a while, or do you see it as pure kidology?last_img read more


first_img Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 3, 2012 at 2:34 am Whatever else may be the case, his sort of thing has a chilling effect on anyone daring to criticize the policies of TEC. Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing July 2, 2012 at 5:10 pm Apparently, completely agreeing with its legal positions is now a matter of doctrine for the Episcopal Church. But at least TEC isn’t like those bullies at the Vatican beating up on poor, innocent nuns. Because that sort of thing would be wrong. July 3, 2012 at 8:57 am If the identity of the Leaker can be ascertained, and if applicable, I would be pleased to invoke The Title IV canons that outline ecclesiastical disciplinary procedures in complaints about the actions of deacons, priests and bishops. Those canons also outline the types of offenses that are subject to the procedures. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tony Green says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Comments (15) Fr. Michael Neal says: Rector Tampa, FL Jesse Snider says: July 4, 2012 at 2:17 pm The Episcopal denomination has truly debased itself through its behavior over that past several (at least) years. It has no honest theology anymore and it has doubled down on the legalism of the Church of Rome. Shameful, so shameful. James Lincoln Sparks, Sr. says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 3, 2012 at 9:34 am I agree with Fr. Frary in that for me, at least, this does not bode well with TEC. Since my Bishop, is one of those named in this “complaint,” it was rather interesting that so far, according to the Bishop’s letter to the clergy of the Diocese, the person(s) making the complaint have yet to be named. That in and of itself is unfathomable. We are becoming a church of “witch hunts” and “back room intrigues” against people with whom we disagree…unfortunately that goes for both sides. And all this, because of “things/posessions.” I know that this is a process and that the process (Canons) must be followed, but since anyone can make a “complaint,” it seems like there will be a bumpy road ahead for TEC. This is all so “Vaticanesque” in an Anglican sort of way. If only Gilbert & Sullivan were around today, our Church’s antics would make a grand operetta – I know who would play the part of the “Lord High Executioner.” Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Christopher Johnson says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Alvah Whealton says: July 3, 2012 at 2:51 pm Is Bishop Matthews truly obligated to see that any whimsical complaint is surrepitiously investigated, or does he make a judgment call? If I issue a complaint about Bishop Matthews, or the PB herself, how far would it get? Will not, in reality, other people than myself issue such complaints? How will we know if they were honored by Bishop Matthews or simply ignored? And, by the way, how does one lodge such a complaint? July 2, 2012 at 8:41 pm Christopher, apparently you have not read the article carefully enough and have jumped to an erroneous conclusion. Any Episcopalian can lodge a complaint. The Church is required to examine every complaint. That is all that is currently happening. The Episcopal Church did not file any complaint itself. Perhaps it would have been wiser to get your facts in order first before making inflammatory accusations? Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 3, 2012 at 12:48 pm There is a place for these bishops. Actually, there are multiple places for them. ACNA, CANA and AMiA. Nigel Taber-Hamilton says: Rector Bath, NC Curt Zimmerman says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 3, 2012 at 12:05 am Should be an interesting convention………………………just saying…………………….. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIcenter_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Fr. Steven A. Scarcia says: July 2, 2012 at 5:49 pm Tough call. An Amicus, as I see it, is an opinion. In this case, the Amici carry greater weight, because those offering them would generally felt to have a greater degree of expertise than some others. This would be offset by their “vested interest” by what sitting bishops might stand to gain challenging a “monolithic” interpretation of the corporate sole.I don’t think the notion of “abandonment of communion” was ever meant to be this far reaching, and I think the narrowness of that definition was affirmed in the presentment against Mark Lawrence in SC. October 25, 2012 at 12:36 pm My understanding is people leave the church, the property does not. Mr. Iker and his group go. Property stay. Mr. Iker walked away from his vows. His followers walked away from TEC. But it looks like they’re looters and thieves in stealing from the church they renounced. Kind of like the rapist who steals from his victim. They had the choice to remain in the church and be the conservative voice, to help maintain the ‘balance’ which is the hallmark of Anglicanism but like spoiled children then didn’t ‘win’ the game so they quit and don’t want to ‘play’ anymore. Part of being a family is that you are not always gonna be able to force your way and part of being a family is tolerating the diversity of the members of that family. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Episcopal News Service] Two complaints apparently have been filed about the involvement of five active bishops and four retired bishops in property litigation in two Episcopal Church dioceses.Word of the complaints surfaced on various blogs and e-mail lists on June 30. No information about either complaint was released by the Episcopal Church, including the name or names of the complainants.According to the reports, including an extensive one here, Bishop Clayton Matthews e-mailed two groups of bishops to tell them that he had received complaints against them and that “in the next few weeks” he would begin the disciplinary process as called for in Title IV.6.3-4 of the canons of the Episcopal Church.It is highly unusual for the existence of a complaint to become public knowledge at this point in the process, regardless the order of the person against whom the complaint is filed.“As cited in Title IV, disciplinary matters are confidential at this stage,” Episcopal Church Public Affairs Officer Neva Rae Fox told Episcopal News Service July 2. “We are honoring that confidentiality.”In one instance, the complaint apparently concerns the fact that seven bishops endorsed an amicus curiae or “friend of the court” brief prepared by the Anglican Communion Institute, Inc. in the pending appeal of a court ruling involving the Diocese of Fort Worth and the bishop, clergy and laity who broke away from that diocese in November 2008.The brief objects to the trial court’s ruling that told the dissidents to return “all property, as well as control of the diocesan corporation” to the Episcopal leaders of the diocese.Tarrant County District Court Judge John Chupp said that because he found that the Episcopal Church’s governance is hierarchical in nature “the court follows Texas precedent governing hierarchical church property disputes, which holds that in the event of a dispute among its members, a constituent part of a hierarchical church consists of those individuals remaining loyal to the hierarchical church body.”Those named in the Fort Worth complaint are retired Diocese of Texas Bishop Maurice M. Benitez, retired Diocese of Central Florida Bishop John W. Howe, Diocese of Dallas Bishop Suffragan Paul E. Lambert, Diocese of Albany Bishop William H. Love, Diocese of Western Louisiana Bishop D. Bruce MacPherson, Diocese of Springfield Bishop Daniel H. Martins, and Diocese of Dallas Bishop James M. Stanton.MacPherson is also named in the other complaint, along with retired Diocese of South Carolina Bishop Edward L. Salmon, Jr. and retired Diocese of Springfield Bishop Peter H. Beckwith. Matthews e-mailed them to say that a complaint has been received against them because they signed affidavits opposing to a motion for summary judgment made by representatives of the Diocese of Quincy and the Episcopal Church in the fall of 2011 to secure diocesan financial assets from a group that broke from the diocese in November 2008.The motion for summary judgment in that case was rejected in December 2011 and the case is due to go to trial in April 2013.The Title IV canons outline ecclesiastical disciplinary procedures in complaints about the actions of deacons, priests and bishops. Those canons also outline the types of offenses that are subject to the procedures.Matthews, who heads the church’s Office of Pastoral Development, also serves as the “intake officer” (the person designated to receive complaints alleging offense) for the church’s Disciplinary Board for Bishops, a body called for in Canon 17 of Title IV. He was appointed the Title IV position by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori.Title IV.6.3-4 says the process begins when the intake officer receives any complaint, after which he or she “may make such preliminary investigation as he or she deems necessary, and shall incorporate the information into a written intake report, including as much specificity as possible.”When the Anglican Communion Institute announced in April that the bishops had signed onto the Fort Worth brief, its statement said that [the bishops had] “no intention of withdrawing from the church, but it is precisely because they intend to remain in the Church that they are concerned that the trial court ruling has misunderstood, and thereby damaged, the constitutional structure of The Episcopal Church.”Diocese of Fort Worth Communication Director Katie Sherrod told ENS July 1 that she could not comment on the reports of a Title IV complaint being lodged against the seven bishops because, due to the confidentiality of the proceedings, she had no information.Jack Iker, who leads to breakaway Fort Worth group, said in a statement that “we are saddened by the report that [the Episcopal Church] is initiating disciplinary measures against seven faithful bishops of the church who have signed an amicus brief in our direct appeal to the Texas Supreme Court.” He accused church “authorities” of resorting to “manipulation and intimidation in an effort to stifle dissent and silence any opposition to their claims.”Bishop Love of Albany told his diocese June 30 that “I have not been officially charged with anything and may not be depending on the outcome of the initial investigation of the ‘complaint.’” He promised to address his participation in the amicus brief with Matthews and others involved in the Title IV process “at the appropriate time.”Springfield’s Martins said in a July 1 blog post called “Speaking the Truth in Love” that he was “distressed” that the July 5-12 meeting of General Convention “which was already going to be a tense time, will be complicated ever further” by the filing of these complaints. He said he signed on to the amicus brief “reluctantly and reservedly” and that he opposes “litigating church disputes in secular court.”Martins said it is “immaterial” if his support of the amicus brief helps either side in the Fort Worth case. “I took the action I did with the best interests of the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Springfield, as nearly as I can discern them, at heart,” he wrote, noting that he was not speaking for the other bishops. “My principal concern was to not leave unchallenged the assertion that the Episcopal Church is a unitary hierarchical organism at all levels, and that the dioceses are entirely creatures of General Convention. I viewed signing the amicus brief as consistent with my vow to uphold the doctrine and discipline of the Episcopal Church.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Josh Thomas says: Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA July 3, 2012 at 1:14 pm When a church such as TEC loses alot of members and witness the upper group of management begins to rule with an iron fist. Make no mistake about what Shori wants. Complete control, no diversity of opinion and a tearing down of all that made our church inclusive. How is that now working for us ? You can either watch it happen as with the budget or voice your opinion. Don’t forget the love fest we are going to have on behalf of the native americans while Shori and gang propose cutting their budget by 50 %. Great talk, no action and you will be run over before you even know it !!!!! Fr Joseph Frary says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 2, 2012 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Mark James says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 2, 2012 at 6:24 pm I don’t read this that TEC initiated. TEC has received complaints and canonically must investigate. Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Disciplinary process set to begin on complaints against nine bishops Title IV actions object to bishops’ part in property litigation cases Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel David Justin Lynch says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem July 3, 2012 at 4:07 pm What are sitting Episcopal bishops doing, supporting the schismatic Jack Iker and his clique in a dispute over who owns the property? Despite Martins’s doublespeak, these aren’t loyalist bishops, they’re people trying to undermine TEC from the inside.The complaint seems appropriate to me, even if the leak does not. David Crawford says: Thomas Andrew says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 17, 2012 at 10:41 am What these bishops did was ill-advised, but not worthy of discipline. The appropriate outcome is an admonition not to do it again. Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more


first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Oct 19, 2012 Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Julie smith says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs October 20, 2012 at 9:47 am i do not want to see the most fragile and vulnerable people hurt because Congress cannot take action. Please, reach an agreement before the deadline and protect the disadvantaged. Advocacy Peace & Justice Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Episcopal Public Policy Network] This is the second in our four-part series that highlights the far-reaching consequences of disproportionate cuts that will be enacted if Congress fails to reach a balanced compromise over the next few months. (The first in the series is here.)Under an agreement Congress reached in 2011, a variety of federal programs that benefit tens-of-millions of people living in poverty at home and around the world will face automatic cuts of 8.2 percent if Congress fails to agree by the end of the year on a balanced approach to alleviating our national deficit.Congress has already cut the International Affairs Budget (which includes nearly all international poverty-focused development assistance) by 15 percent over the last two years; International Affairs is now only one percent of the federal budget.Contact your members of congress TODAY – express your concern for the people affected by the deep cuts to international poverty-focused development assistance programs forced by the sequester.What is at stake for impoverished people around the world if Congress makes an additional 8.2 percent ($4.7 billion) cut to these programs?Food Assistance: Food for Peace and other U.S. food aid programs feed 66 million vulnerable people and more than 5 million hungry school children each year. If the 8.2 percent cut takes effect, 3.33 million people and 377,200 children will have their access to lifesaving food aid and school feeding programs reduced or denied.HIV/AIDS Treatment and Prevention: Every year 4 million people living with HIV or AIDS receive lifesaving antiretroviral treatments from the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and other global health programs. An 8.2 percent cut would cause 276,500 fewer people to receive treatment for HIV/AIDS, including 112,500 fewer HIV-positive pregnant women. This could cause up to 63,000 more AIDS-related deaths and 21,000 more infants infected with HIV at birth.Malaria Prevention: Under an 8.2 percent cut to the President’s Malaria Initiative and other global health programs, 2.2 million fewer insecticide-treated nets would be distributed to families and communities vulnerable to malaria at a time when nets distributed over the past several years by NetsforLife® and other initiatives must now be replaced.Refugee Assistance: There are an estimated 15.3 million refugees worldwide. The Migration and Refugee Assistance (MRA) account provides lifesaving services including food, health care, water, sanitation, and shelter for refugees in protracted situations and emergency crises. The proposed 8.2 percent cut to the MRA account would endanger this lifesaving assistance for refugees, as well as put at risk programs that help make refugee populations self-sufficient and less reliant on long-term aid.Tell Congress that you care how these cuts will affect the world’s poorest and most vulnerable. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 EPPN: Domestic Programs – What’s at stake in the budget Part 2 Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Comments (1) Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Tags Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more


first_imgHogar transicional ayuda a veteranas a salir adelante TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK La Rda. Kelly Ayer, directora de Casa Sión [Zion House], y dos de las residentes de la casa conversan en el traspatio de la institución. Foto para ENS de Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] Luego de abandonar una relación malsana, Linda, una veterana de la Armada de EE.UU., se mudo con su hijo y la novia de éste —hasta que los tres juntos no pudieron seguir cubriendo el alquiler.“Él [su hijo] estaba trabajando 20 horas semanales en Wendy’s, y eso no alcanzaba. Nos quedamos todos en la calle”, dijo Linda, de 60 años, quien prefiere no dar su apellido.Durante 11 años, Linda trabajó como empleada estacional en una planta procesadora de alimentos del interior del estado de Nueva York, enlatando remolachas, zanahorias, hortalizas mezcladas… Ella hacía hasta $16 por hora, pero no pudo ir la última temporada.“Padezco de depresión… tuve un montón de cosas en la niñez”, dijo ella. “Cargo con muchísimas cosas”.Al perder el apartamento, Linda se acercó a un proveedor de servicios sociales  de la localidad para que la ayudara a conseguir un lugar donde guardar sus muebles y ahí se enteró que tenía derecho a recibir beneficios para veteranos.“Yo iba a pedir prestada una tienda de campaña para irme a vivir a orillas del río”, dijo. “Me sorprendió descubrir que tenía algunos beneficios; y los tengo todos”.A fines de mayo, Linda llegó a Casa Sión, un hogar de tránsito para veteranas sin hogar establecido en 2010 por la iglesia episcopal de Sión [Zion Episcopal Church] en Avon, Nueva York, en su antigua rectoría.  En el momento de su fundación, Casa Sión fue uno de dos de estos hogares de tránsito en toda la nación; en la actualidad existe una docena de tales hogares.Treinta mujeres han buscado refugio en Casa Sión en sus dos primeros años de funcionamiento. Todas han sido víctimas de trauma sexual militar y trastorno del estrés postraumático; una cuarta parte ha tenido problemas de consumo de drogas (las residentes deben haber estado libre de drogas durante 30 días antes de ingresar); y algunas han tenido o tienen esquizofrenia o bipolaridad o trastornos de personalidad fronteriza, dijo la Rda. Kelly Ayer, de 39 años, directora de Casa Sión.(El Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos usa la definición federal de “trauma sexual militar” para describir la experiencia del asalto sexual y, también, “acoso sexual repetido e intimidatorio”).Progreso, no perfecciónEn 1994, el Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos (VA por su sigla en inglés) estableció el Centro de Veteranas para revisar los programas para mujeres y garantizar que las mujeres, sin discriminación, tuviesen acceso a los beneficios y servicios a la par que sus colegas varones. En 2011, el departamento creó el Equipo de Trabajo de Veteranas [women’s Veterans Task Force] para desarrollar un plan de acción que resolviera las fallas en la manera de atender a éstas.Pese a los avances y a los empeños del VA, Ayer dijo que había resultado frustrante atestiguar la falta de atención, de seguimiento y de comunicación entre los médicos y los proveedores de servicios.“Percibo que el VA ha dilatado mucho sus recursos, percibo eso,” dijo ella. “Pero al mismo tiempo es muy frustrante no sólo para nosotros que las atendemos, sino también para las veteranas”.“Ya es difícil para las mujeres ir al VA, especialmente si han resultado lastimadas en las fuerzas armadas”, explicó Ayer. “Les han traicionado la confianza, de manera que les resulta difícil buscar ayuda de una institución asociada con los militares”.En 1950, sólo el 2 por ciento de los soldados uniformados eran mujeres. En la actualidad, las mujeres representan el 14 por ciento de los soldados en servicio activo y al 18 por ciento de la Guardia Nacional, la cual tiene aproximadamente unos 2,9 millones de soldados divididos casi a la mitad entre los que están en activo y en la reserva. Las veteranas forman el grupo que crece con mayor celeridad, totalizando el 8 por ciento de los 22,2 millones de veteranos, conforme a cifras de 2011 y según un borrador de 2012 del Informe de un Equipo de Trabajo sobre las Veteranas.Las veteranas también representan el segmento de la población de veteranos sin hogar que aumenta con mayor rapidez, y corren mayor riesgo de convertirse en desamparadas que los hombres. En 2010, cerca de 7.000 mujeres, o el 6 por ciento de los 116.000 veteranos que se encuentran sin hogar, recibieron servicios para desamparados  del VA.Un interés en las veteranas, particularmente las que se encuentran sin hogar y las que han sido víctimas de abusos, va parejo con el incremento de su número, dijo James B. Magness, obispo episcopal sufragáneo para los Ministerios Federales. Él dijo hace poco que ha visto un aumento en el número de historias de veteranas que aparecen en revistas publicadas por los Veteranos de Guerras Extranjeras [Veterans of Foreign Wars], la Legión Americana [American Legion] y los Veteranos Estadounidenses Discapacitados [Disabled American Veterans].“Estamos llevando cuenta de esto”, dijo él a ENS en una entrevista telefónica desde su oficina en Washington, D.C. “La incidencia de la población de veteranas en necesidad de servicios ha dado lugar al peor escenario”.Cada vez hay más mujeres en servicio activo, y sirviendo en posiciones de “avanzada” —más cerca del combate en “los teatros de operaciones”— y consecuentemente sufriendo mayores traumas y con más incidencias de abusos que salen a la luz, dijo Magness, añadiendo que la recesión económica también contribuyó a ese “escenario”.Hogar dulce hogarEn Casa Sión, un albergue en medio de ese [deprimente] escenario, un almanaque de pared y una tablilla que registra ingresos y egresos coordina las citas de las mujeres, sus horarios de trabajo, los calendarios de cocina y limpieza, y las entradas y salidas en general, así como la disponibilidad de una asesora de servicios que ayuda a cada mujer a desarrollar un plan hacia la independencia.La licencia de Casa Sión permite [el alojamiento] hasta de seis mujeres, todas las cuales reciben $38 diarios del VA para comida, transporte y vivienda. La mitad de las que llegan vienen remitidas por el VA; el resto de las residentes llegan porque se enteran de viva voz y gracias a la red regional de Ayer. (En mayo, Ayer recibió la Condecoración de Héroe Militar en la Cruz Roja Americana del programa “Héroes de la Ciudad Natal”).Las residentes pueden quedarse hasta dos años, pero la estadía promedio ha sido de seis meses, dijo Ayer. La mayoría se muda a un alojamiento permanente, otras se mudan con una familia, y algunas, en esos casos raros que conllevan una grave enfermedad mental, son remitidas de vuelta al cuidado del VA.Ayer, veterana ella misma del Ejército de EE.UU. que pasó dos años en servicio activo como enfermera de combate y seis años en la reserva, sufrió de trauma sexual militar y aún padece de trastorno por estrés postraumático (PTSD, sigla en inglés).“Cuando salí del Ejército, me fui con un sabor amargo en la boca. Era un red de machistas”, dijo Ayers que, como lesbiana de la época de “no preguntes, no digas”, sufrió acoso sexual de parte de oficiales de alta graduación, cuenta ella.“Una de las cosas que ha hecho por mí el ser directora de Casa Sión es que me ha permitido recuperar mi orgullo por haber servido [en las fuerzas armadas]”, afirmó. “Ahora me enorgullezco de haber estado en el Ejército, y me enorgullezco no sólo de que estoy sirviendo a mi iglesia, sino de que estoy de nuevo sirviendo a mi país mediante el trabajo con estas mujeres”.El asalto sexual en las fuerzas armadas no es algo nuevo. En 2005, el Congreso ordenó que el Departamento de Defensa de EE.UU. creará un equipo de trabajo sobre el asalto sexual en las fuerzas armadas luego de que se hiciera evidente que mujeres y hombres estaban reportando asaltos sexuales en número creciente.Una de cada cinco mujeres y uno de cada 100 hombres dice haber experimentado trauma sexual militar. Pero, incluso por los propios cálculos oficinales, esas cifras resultan bajas dado que el trauma sexual con frecuencia se queda sin denunciar y los datos representan las tasas entre los veteranos que han pedido asistencia médica del VA y “no la tasa real de todos los que sirven en las Fuerzas Armadas de EE.UU.”, según un volante informativo del VA. (Véase “La guerra invisible” [The Invisible War]), un documental de 2012 acerca de la epidemia de violaciones en los organismos militares de EE.UU.).En Casa Sión, las cosas pueden tornarse frenéticas en cualquier momento en que hay hasta seis mujeres viviendo allí, todas ellas en encrucijadas de sus vidas y todas habiendo sido víctimas de traumas y, algunas de ellas, de abusos físicos y sexuales que se remontan a la infancia. Ayer y estas mujeres, con café y cigarrillos, pasan buena parte del tiempo conversando.“No le temo a sentarme junto a alguien que sufre, y creo que esa es la clave de este trabajo”, dijo Ayer. “Algunas de estas señoras se sienten como si tuvieran la culpa del mal que les han hecho, y tanto que se dicen a sí mismas que no merecen existir. Yo les digo que se les quiere y ellas creen que soy una charlatana por decirles que son amadas por el solo hecho de existir.“Ellas no me creen, pero yo digo, está bien, y sigo diciéndoselos.Casa Sión está radicada en Avon, un pueblito pintoresco del estado de Nueva York, de sólo 7.000 habitantes, que queda a 26 millas al sur de Rochester. La iglesia se encuentra en el extremo superior izquierdo de una rotonda que  circunvala el centro del pueblo, donde los hombres, y algunas esposas, se encuentran por las mañanas para tomar café y desayunar en el restaurante Village, muy cerca de la calle principal [Main Street].Cuando el rector de Sión, el Rdo. Mark Stiegler, le propuso por primera vez a la junta parroquial solicitar un programa de subvenciones del VA para ayudar a cambiar la rectoría en un hogar de tránsito para veteranos, la respuesta fue “no”, cuenta él.“Todo lo que [los miembros de la junta parroquial] podían prever era un montón de soldados borrachos haraganeando en el pórtico”, dijo Stiegler —que prestó servicio en el Ejército de EE.UU. de 1959  1962 y luego en la reserva hasta 1966— durante una entrevista el 11 de septiembre en su oficina.Posteriormente, sirviendo como consejero de pesar y pérdida en su papel de capellán del VA en Rochester, Stiegler encontró a una mujer que estaba a punto de quedarse sin hogar. Ella le dijo: “Deberían tener lugares para mujeres, así como los tienen para hombres”.La mujer se estaba refiriendo a la Casa de Richard (Richard’s House), un lugar para hombres administrado por Veterans Outreach en Rochester.“Le presenté eso a la junta parroquial y prendió de inmediato”, dijo.Hubo que pasar por el rechazo de dos  solicitudes de subvenciones y esperar más de tres años antes de que Sión obtuviera la aprobación del VA, y otros dos años antes de que Casa Sión recibiera a la primera residente. A través del proceso de [para obtener] la subvención y de habilitar la casa y continuar con el funcionamiento del programa, Sión ha dependido de más de 30 voluntarios y de donaciones de individuos y organizaciones, contando con las Damas Auxiliares de los Veteranos de Guerras Extranjeras entre sus más firmes partidarios. Por ejemplo, [la rama de] las Damas Auxiliares en Nueva York le dio a Sión una subvención de $26.000, contó Stiegler.La casa tiene un presupuesto operativo anual de poco más de $100.000 y depende de donaciones para cubrir costos, más allá de la asignación diaria del VA. Las residentes capaces de trabajar contribuyen hasta con el 30 por ciento de sus ingresos para el alquiler. Casa Sión también comenzó un programa de rehabilitación laboral, Boadicea Spa Products, para ofrecerles a las mujeres la opción de trabajar, y de ese modo compensar los costos de funcionamiento de la casa.Entre las actuales residentes, Linda se incorporó a la Armada de EE.UU. a los 28 años —luego de trabajar como “oficial de repartos”, o  encargada de la nómina en términos civiles, en Pensacola, Florida— y la destacaron en Guam. Para entonces siendo madre soltera e incapaz de movilizarse en el tiempo indicado, abandonó la Armada en 1984.Linda aún considera que la vida militar es estupenda. “De muchísimas maneras, es la  familia, dijo.Maggie, de 49 años, otra veterana que vive en la casa, sirvió ocho meses en el Ejército, en Fort Jackson,  en Columbia, Carolina de Sur, antes de que un sargento, del estado mayor la atacara durante un ejercicio de entrenamiento. Ella le dijo a su capitán que si él no podía protegerla, ella tenía que irse.“Yo sabía que tenía que hacer algo. Si simplemente me hubiera echado a llorar, nada habría ocurrido”, dijo, y agregó que entró en las fuerzas armadas a los 17 años y salió a los 18.Maggie, que también prefirió no decir su apellido, alquiló un cuarto y se buscó un empleo. Finalmente, se abrió paso en la administración del control de la calidad en Kodak, antes de que la despidieran (Eastman Kodak, que tiene su sede central en Rochester,  ha sido históricamente uno de los primeros empleadores de la región, lo cual se remonta a la invención del rollo de película por George Eastman y la fundación de la compañía en el siglo XIX. Los despidos masivos comenzaron en 2004).Maggie también paso 15 años trabajando como asistente social. Hasta diciembre de 2011, cuando una mujer de 46 años en un súbito estallido de cólera la atacó en una gasolinera. Maggie dirigía su propio servicio de taxis y limusinas. Después del ataque, “no pude seguir haciéndolo y perdí el negocio”.Y luego lo perdió todo. En un albergue de desamparados en Rochester, un coordinador de servicio de veteranos le habló de Casa Sión. Ella y su perro “Dot” que vive allí también, llegaron a principios de junio.“Es un lugar seguro para descansar la cabeza”, dijo Maggie. Cumplir 50 años sin saber lo que reserva el futuro, añadió “es algo que me angustia mucho ¿Qué quiero hacer? … Creo que todas las mujeres nos sentimos así, preocupadas por nuestro futuro”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Por Lynette WilsonPosted Nov 12, 2012 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more


first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Latin America, Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Lynette WilsonPosted May 8, 2014 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN center_img Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Honduras: Schools play a role in self-sustainability, society Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Self-Sustainability An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Province IX, Miriam Rivkin, a member of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in DeLand, Florida, visited St. Mary’s Episcopal School in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, in March during a trip to explore potential partnerships. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – San Pedro Sula, Honduras] Episcopal schools in the Diocese of Honduras not only have a role in moving the church toward self-sustainability; they also play a role in transforming communities.“Children profit from education, teachers are employed, students receive an Episcopal Church education, which is also part of our evangelism program,” said the Rev. Canon Lura Kaval, the diocese’s canon for development and an Episcopal Church-appointed missionary.Schools are a main source of income for the diocese; it operates seven, faith-based bilingual schools serving 1,500 students from prekindergarten through 11th grade, the final grade level required in Honduras.“As a whole they are in the black; some of them are in better shape than others, but all are headed in the right direction with great potential for growth,” said Kaval,For instance, at St. Mary’s Episcopal School in Tegucigalpa, the Rev. Canon Joe Rhodes and his wife, Tina, missionaries sent by the Society of Anglican Missionaries and Senders, are working to bring the school toward profitability.“We have 158 students now, we need 200 to be profitable,” explained Rhodes to a group from St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in DeLand, Florida, who visited in March during a trip to explore potential partnerships.Longtime supporters of the diocese, the Rhodes over the years have led many short-term mission teams to Honduras while Joe Rhodes served as the rector of Holy Spirit Church in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. They have served the school for the last 18 months.Bishop Lloyd Allen founded St. Mary’s School in 1994 while serving St. Mary’s Church; the bishop personally asked the Rhodes to move to Tegucigalpa to assist the school full time.The Diocese of Honduras operates seven, faith-based bilingual schools serving 1,500 students from prekindergarten through 11th grade. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSIn recent years, Allen has worked to focus the diocese’s attention on achieving self-sustainability by 2019; in addition to the diocese’s self-sustainability plan, the schools have a separate strategic aimed at self-sufficiency.As part of the plan, administrators are working toward international accreditation with the help of Steven Robinson, president of the Southern Association of Independent Schools, a U.S.-based accrediting agency.“The schools there are really fascinating and I think they serve a tremendous purpose, some of the schools have a long way to go, but the flagship, [El] Buen Pastor, in San Pedro Sula, is probably eligible now if not close,” said Robison, in a telephone interview with ENS.Accreditation at its core means a school is fulfilling its mission; and that a school is financially sustainable and has good governance, explained Robinson.“It [accreditation] doesn’t mean all schools are equal; that’s largely dependent on the resources they have,” said Robinson. “It means they are serving the mission they set out to serve.”A young girl prays during Sunday school at St. Peter’s by the Sea Episcopal Church in Brick Bay in Roatán, Honduras. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSAt the heart of each Episcopal school’s mission is a commitment to Christian education and the diocese has committed to translating from English to Spanish the Episcopal Children’s Curriculum, developed by Virginia Theological Seminary, so that it can share it with others looking for Christian educational resources in Spanish, said Kaval. The diocese plans to begin using the curriculum in both the schools and its Sunday schools in the fall.Robinson became involved with the Episcopal schools in Honduras in 2010 when he met Andrea Baker at a National Association of Episcopal Schools conference in San Antonio, Texas.“She saw my nametag and asked, ‘do you accredit? And can we talk?’” said Robinson.Baker invited Robinson to visit Honduras, which he did. “I fell in love with the schools and the work of Bishop Allen,” he said, adding that what the diocese is doing with its schools is “at the heart of what education should be.”Since then, Robinson has been involved with the schools and this summer plans to run professional development workshops in Honduras. It’s a matter of working with the schools to understand where they are, where they need to be, and assisting them as they grow toward accreditation, he said.El Buen Pastor, the school Robinson referred to in San Pedro Sula, was founded in 1984 and has since grown to more than 500 students grades pre-k through 11. Some of El Buen Pastor’s students have gone on to attend universities in the United States.Other schools, like St. John’s Episcopal School in Siguatepeque, a small town in the central mountains, are just getting started.Rick Harlow, the diocese’s project manager, and Episcopal Church-appointed missionary, explained that the school serves 48 students grades prekindergarten through fourth grade, next year the school will add fifth grade and more space for prekindergarten students.  The school currently has an 80-student capacity.Episcopal schools operate on the same 10-month calendar as schools in the United States, not the public schools’November to February calendar, normal for the country’s private schools. For this reason, the schools tend to grow from year to year as students graduate from one grade level to the next, and from new students enrolling in prekindergarten and kindergarten.One way to recruit new students is to make the school more appealing. In March, for instance, construction was underway on a horseshoe-shaped driveway where parents can drop off and pick up their children in front of the school instead of on the busy street in front of the church.The driveway and additional classroom space constitute the first phase of construction; the second phase will include a cafeteria and kitchen and additional classrooms.“We have to work year by year by year with the resources available,” said Harlow, adding that teams from churches in the United States have thus far helped with the school building’s construction and there’s still a need.Not far from St. John’s, also in Siguatepeque, the Rev. Vaike Madisson de Molina started a first-aid clinic that three years later has turned into a nursing school recognized by the Ministry of Health. In 2009, Allen told his clergy they’d need to look at their communities and create something to move their missions toward self-sustainability, so de Molina, inspired by Florence Nightingale’s legend, turned to healthcare.The Nightingale Centro Episcopal de Formación de Auxiliar de Enfermería opened in December 2011 and graduated its first 14 students in December 2013.The Rev. Vaike Madisson de Molina shows architectural renderings for the nursing school to the Rev. Canon Lura Kaval, the dioceses canon for development. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSGiven the school’s successes, de Molina has plans for a two-story building that will house classrooms and a laboratory alongside her church, San Bartolomé Apóstol, moving the school out of the parish hall.“This project, I love it,” she said during an interview in her home. “I think Jesus Christ is happy … some members of the church are even now students.”De Molina chose the nursing school, she said, partly because she likes the story of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, which she feels fits nicely with the history of the Anglican Church, but also because she recognized a need for a permanent medical clinic in the community. And she saw the school as a way to give women, many of them single mothers, a means of supporting themselves.Josselin Flores, 18, is one such student. Flores works at the church and studies at the nursing school, while her mother cares for her 18-month-old baby.“I want to have a better life and to care of others,” said Flores in an interview at the church.Sixty percent of Honduras’7.9 million people live at the poverty line, according to World Bank statistics. The average adult has 6.5 years of education, according to United Nations Development Program data.Founding an Episcopal university in Honduras is a long-range goal of the bishop, especially in a post-9/11 world where it has become increasingly difficult for students to secure visas to study in the United States, and the currency exchange rate between the Honduran Lempira and the U.S. dollar puts the cost out of reach for most students coming from a low-middle income country.“Not only is the bishop committed to self-sufficiency model of empowerment rather than dependency … the schools not only play a tremendous part it that, but through education the Episcopal Church is in a position to change a nation,” said Robinson.From his experience and travels, Robinson hasn’t seen another independent schools system poised for such a high return on investment.“I’m very blessed and fortunate to work with almost 400 of best schools in the world, including 40 Episcopal schools, travel the world and talk on a variety of issues,” he said. “I don’t know of any place where good, strong Episcopal schools could have an impact on the entire nation. Honduras could be impacted by the school system and I don’t say that lightly.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

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