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first_imgI recently started running again. It’s incredibly difficult to start running when you haven’t run in a long time. You don’t have the stamina, and your body hurts from the stress, especially your joints. And your form is poor, so you’re expending way too much energy for the actual speed at which you are running. At some point you start to get a little bit faster, and you start to feel a lot better. But that time doesn’t come quickly. About that time, you remember that you should never have stopped running in the first place.This post is not about running. It’s about prospecting. Like running, once you stop, it’s incredibly difficult to get started again. When you do find the will to pick up the phone and make your calls, it doesn’t feel good. It’s been too long since you’ve taken these actions. And your results are poor. Sometimes your results are poor because you’re not calling the right people, having not made calls in such a long time. Other times your results are poor because you are so out of practice. Improvement doesn’t come easy. It takes time, effort, and energy to get your chops back.This post is to remind you to never stop.When you have no work and desperately need new clients, you should spend your time prospecting.When you’ve gotten a lot of work and your pipeline is full, you should still be prospecting Anything that is in your pipeline isn’t yet a deal, and you never know what the future holds.Even when you have more work than you can possibly handle and your operations team is complaining that you are outstripping their capacity, you should still be prospecting.After you die, for the next four days you should still be prospecting, just in case. Seriously, don’t lose your momentum, lose your muscles, and lose your discipline. It’s more difficult to start over than it is to do the work you need to do today. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more


first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now There are two kinds of companies.Resourceful OptimisticsThe first kind of company believes that the difficult challenges that their clients and prospects present them are opportunities. Let’s call these companies “resourceful optimistics.” Optimism gives them the belief that something is possible. Their resourcefulness allows them to find a way or make one.These companies see challenges and obstacles as problems to solve. Solving those problems gives them the ability to create new value that they can use to help out other companies and people solve those same problems.Resourceful optimistics see problem-solving as value creation and new capabilities. And because they see the world this way, they competitively displace a lot of the sales organizations that are unwilling to solve these challenges.Unresourceful StasistsThe second kind of company believes that their sweet spot is so well-defined that anything difficult is something to be avoided. They don’t want challenging work; they want to do what they already know how to do and what they already do well. They like stasis.These companies see problem-solving as a problem. They see difficult clients that are going to stretch them as too much work. They don’t exercise their creative faculties to generate new solutions. When their client’s world changes and new problems occur, these resourceful stasists lose their business to sales organizations who solve the problems they aren’t interested in working on.What you are unwilling to do, someone else sees as an opportunity. They see it as a chance to win a new client. Resourceful optimistics believe that there is some innovation that can be deployed to create new value and solve those problems, deepen relationships, and retain the clients they take from competitors who refuse to solve problems.last_img read more


first_imgTiffany wrote to ask me how she might set herself apart. She asked whether training and certifications might help her distinguish herself, especially as it pertains to becoming a leader in a few years.Many of the best salespeople in the world  would be judged to have been poorly trained, if you look only at their formal classroom training. All who have been trained would say they enjoyed training, learned something useful, and they will tell you what part they apply to their work today. They will also describe how they were taught in more informal ways every day.Very few of the best salespeople credit certifications as being what sets them apart from their peers, even while telling you they are happy they had a chance to go through the process and that they learned a lot they still use.Distinguishing yourself isn’t a matter of formal training, even though it is still worth your time. This recipe will serve you whether you have the formal training and certifications or not.Outwork Them: This is nowhere near as difficult as it sounds. Most people aren’t willing to work hard. They count their hours instead of their outcomes. They are “clock punchers” who try to keep busy between normal business hours, even if being busy isn’t productive. Being out-hustled is a choice, as is out-hustling everyone else.Out-Study Them: There are all kinds of statistics about how few sales books salespeople read. Some suggest that 95 percent of salespeople have never read a single book on sales in their life. Assuming that number is correct, or close enough, that means reading a single book is more than almost any of your peers. Reading, especially non-fiction, will help you develop faster than your non-reading peer group.Learn Faster: This is different than studying. Like most human endeavors, sales isn’t something you can learn to do by reading a book. You can’t learn to swim or ride a bike by reading a book, and you can’t learn to sell that way either. Books are what provide you with a framework to understand what you are doing and what you might do while you are actually selling. They multiply the speed at which you learn, but only if you take time to reflect on what you are doing, make meaningful adjustments, and apply new ideas.Get Coaching: The performers in almost any field have coaches, or they had someone that coached them as they developed. Some had different coaches at different stages of their development, even if the person wasn’t a formal, professional coach. A good coach can help you see areas for improvement that you haven’t recognized. They can also tell you directly how to do some things that will literally compress your learning curve by decades.Be Better with People: The more effective you are with more people, the better your results in sales (and in life). The more you develop empathy, the ability to take someone else’s perspective, the more you will differentiate yourself from the crowd. The more willing you are to commit to helping others, especially when it comes to dealing with difficult challenges and situations, the more you set yourself apart from others. Even though very few people are willing to talk about these issues, choosing to believe that sales is a science, this is where the action is.The intention to be the best, when followed with consistent action, will propel you to the top of your field. Ambition is a powerful force, especially when coupled with a willingness to put in the time and effort.If you want to be a leader, then you have to lead. You have to take accountability for outcomes, and then you have to lead others in helping you to achieve those outcomes. You never have to wait for someone to make you a leader. You just have to do the things that allow them to recognize it in you. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more


first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now You don’t have time not to prospect. Prospecting isn’t ever going to be something urgent enough to capture your attention until is too late for prospecting to be of any use to you. Once you fall behind, it’s impossibly difficult to catch up because you can’t do anything about the sales cycle.You don’t have time not to nurture your dream clients. Your dream clients are going to take a long time to win. They are already working with your competitor, and they have relationships that they aren’t going to throw away because you call them. The best time to start nurturing your dream clients was two years ago. The next best time is right now.You don’t have time not to develop yourself personally and professionally. You live in time of accelerating, disruptive change. Keeping up with this change is going to require that you reinvent yourself, over and over again. You don’t have time not to work on that reinvention. You are going to need a different mindset and skill set in the future, and you need to build that now.You don’t have time not to say thank you. The little things are still the big things. Gratitude is one of them. If your prospective client makes time to meet with you, send a note of appreciation. If they give you their business, you should be grateful enough to send a personal note thanking them for their trust in you.You do not have time not to have a presence with your clients. You have time for your email. You have time to open a browser. You are present on Facebook and Instagram. If you have time for that, you have to show up and have a presence at your client’s location. Presence is proof you care, and you don’t have time not to be present. Complacency and entitlement are things that catch up with you without warning.You don’t have time not to come up with the next idea. The way to retain clients is to go from one valuable initiative to the next without interruption. That’s quarter after quarter, and year after year, always pressing forward. A lack of new value is what opens you up to being competitively displaced.You have time for whatever you believe is important. If you don’t have time for what is important, you need to pause and reevaluate your priorities. There is no time to do this when it’s already too late.last_img read more


first_imgThe Alwar police in Rajasthan on Thursday said they have arrested three persons on the charge of beating to death a man for ”transporting cows for slaughter.”The deceased was one of the 15 persons who were brutally beaten up in Alwar on Saturday in the latest violence by cow vigilante groups in the State.Police said the animals were dairy cows that the cattle rearers had purchased at a cattle fair.Police officer Rahul Prakash said the three were arrested on Wednesday night and they were on the lookout for six others.last_img


first_imgRajbala from Satna in Madhya Pradesh had barely started a conversation with her husband who was travelling with her to Haridwar when their coach seemed to jump into the air near Khatauli.They were making plans about the things they will do after taking a dip in the Ganga at Haridwar on August 21, 2017 on the occasion of “Somti Amayasya”, a day of great significance for Hindus. Suddenly it was all dark and she passed out. She remembered being pulled out from the coach by someone. On regaining consciousness, her thought was about her husband who was missing. All she could hear were cries and there were lifeless bodies all around. Rajesh Das from Kolkata was also travelling to Haridwar with a group of 40 women from his colony to take a dip in the Ganga. The local residents of Khatauli cut the window of S1 and pulled him out. Amid noise and fear all around, he managed to pull some of his fellow travellers. “There was this extremely loud sound, after which I remember people sitting above my birth fell on me. It was almost like an earthquake. I thought I am going to die of suffocation and then I became unconscious,” remembered teary-eyed Mr. Das who was yet to locate six fellow travellers from his group. “I don’t know what happened to them. What will we say to their families?” Like Ms. Das and Mr. Rajbala, there were hundreds of passengers who were going to Haridwar on the occasion of “Somti Amavasya”.On August 20, 2017, there were many people outside the mortuary, looking for their loved ones. Muzaffarnagar resident Iftikhar, a man in his late 30s, was looking for his younger brother, Ishtiyaq, who was travelling by the same train. “I could not find him anywhere. His phone is switched off. He is not there in the list of injured. I have come here finally with my worst fears coming true,” he said. Sahil Ahmad, anothr Muzaffarnagar resident who was coming from Puri, suffered minor injuries. Sitting on a bed of Khatauli health centre, he recounted those 10 seconds which he would “never to go through again”. “No one had a clear idea what was happening. But everyone was afraid that they may not be alive to know what happened. There was complete darkness before my eyes. Someone pulled me out of the window,” he said. When he came out all he could hear was screams for help and injured people. Most of the survivors complained that the official machinery reached late. The local residents helping the accident victims were furious with the administration. Some of them brought their own gas cutting machines to open the mangled coaches.Ten minutes before his AC coach jumped off the track and swung in air only to fall on other coaches, Vishal had called home in Gwalior and told his family every thing was fine. He too was headed for Haridwar. “I can only thank god for keeping me alive because what I saw after regaining consciousness made me cry. I saw bodies and people crying for help,” Mr. Vishal said.There were hundreds of local residents of Khatauli who were the first ones to reach on the spot and rescue people. Some of them like Sanjeev who lives in the railway colony where the accident happened, told The Hindu that “witnessing the accident and seeing the coaches on each other, in itself, was a horror”.“There was such a din that you cannot understand who was saying what. In one coach we saw people were stuck, trying to come out of the derailed bogey. Without thinking, some of us started pulling people out,” he said trying to catch his breath.last_img read more


first_imgThe indefinite curfew clamped in four police station areas of the walled city here, following Friday night’s violence, was relaxed for two hours on Monday, after the post mortem and burial of the youth allegedly killed in the police firing. The situation remained peaceful during the relaxation as local residents thronged the markets to buy essential items.The burial rites of Mohammed Rais alias Adil, 22, were performed peacefully under high security cover at the Ghat Gate graveyard in the presence of members of a peace committee and local leaders. The administration allowed only a limited number of persons to attend the burial.The State government has agreed to allot a dairy booth and payment of compensation to the Rais’ family, as well as a probe into the firing incident.Earlier, there there was a deadlock over autopsy of the youth’s body, as the next of his kin had refused to allow it while demanding suspension of the staff of Ramganj police station, compensation and a government job for a family member.Senior Congress leader Ashok Gehlot questioned the silence of Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje on the issue, saying there was no word of concern or appeal from the “twitter-friendly CM” so far. “The Chief Minister might be following the Prime Minister’s way of keeping silent,” he remarked.Divisional Commissioner Rajeshwar Singh issued order for extending suspension of the mobile internet services till Tuesday midnight in 12 police station areas of the city. Official sources said this was done to check the spread of rumours.last_img read more


first_imgAir cargo traffic in India is expected to grow close to 60% in the next five years to 4.7 million tonnes but infrastructure bottlenecks remain a major constraint to the growth in the sector, a report said on Tuesday.The country needs to upgrade its air cargo handling capacity to deal with the growth in traffic, rating agency ICRA said in a note.Combined capacity Airports currently have a combined capacity to handle 4.63 million tonnes of cargo per annum. Cargo traffic in India crossed 2.98 million tonnes in FY2017 and reached 2.5 million tonnes in the first nine months of FY2018. “Cargo handling capacity at airports would need to be upgraded by around 2 million tonnes over the next five years,” ICRA said. It also highlighted that lack of sufficient cargo handling infrastructure at tier 2 and 3 cities, congestion at major cargo terminals in the metros and lack of dedicated facilities for cargo operators had resulted in delays and increased transaction costs.“High dwell time [time from cargo arrival to custom clearance] leads to significant transaction costs and operating expense for the air cargo operators. One way to achieve lower dwell time to match with global standards is air freight stations, which can help decongest airports,” Harsh Jagnani, ICRA’s sector head for corporate ratings said. Despite healthy growth in traffic, cargo handled at all airports in India in 2017 was 3.3 million tonnes, which was significantly lower than cargo handled at the world’s busiest airport in Hong Kong, which is said to have handled 4.9 million tonnes.last_img read more


first_imgThe Calcutta High Court on Tuesday asked the State Election Commission (SEC) to consult all stakeholders as far as security arrangements for holding the panchayat polls were concerned. The development comes after widespread violence was reported during the last day for filing of nominations for the rural polls on Monday.“It is made clear that the consultation by the SEC on the aspect of security arrangements with the stakeholders shall be meaningful without seeking to at all impinge on the Commission’s prerogative to carry forwards the electoral process,” the order by Justice Subrata Talukdar said. Application acceptedThe court, however, refused to intervene in the petition by the Opposition parties to extend the date for nominations. Justice Talukdar, however, directed the SEC to accept the nomination papers of independent candidates from Bhangar area who being unable to file their nomination papers in person and sent it to the authorities concerned through a messenger app using Internet services.During the day, there were a number of meetings between officials of the State Election Commission and the West Bengal government representatives but they failed to arrive at a consensus on the dates for holding the panchayat polls. The development came after violence was reported across different districts of the State on Monday.last_img read more


first_imgFormer Haryana Chief Minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda on Tuesday said the people of Haryana have already made up their minds to vote out the BJP and bring the Congress back to power.Mr. Hooda was addressing public gatherings in villages in the Fatehabad district during the fourth leg of his ‘Jan Kranti Yatra’. “The BJP grabbed power on false promises made to the people. Now they have forgotten about their promises and are only focused on destroying the social fabric of the State for political gains. The people of Haryana understand their games and every segment is disappointed with the BJP. The INLD is supposedly the main Opposition party but they are behaving as associates of the ruling party,” he said.Mr. Hooda said that based on the feedback he got from his Yatra, he was confident that the Congress is on a comeback trail and they will form the next government. “Increasing old-age pension to ₹3,000 p.m. would be the first decision of the Congress government.”last_img read more


first_imgAt a time when the #MeToo fire rages on with several women unmasking their harassers, a campaign is under way in Odisha’s migration-prone districts to sensitise migrant women workers about sexual exploitation.Sexual exploitation of women migrant workers from Odisha is widely regarded to be pronounced. But their agonising and harrowing ordeal mostly remains under wraps. They often suffer silently with no one to back them or confront their tormenters. Now, 300 women are undergoing an orientation programme in the State that seeks to empower them to raise their voices against any type of sexual exploitation and ensure the safety of accompanying vulnerable adolescent girls.As a three-lakh-strong workforce is getting ready to travel to other States, women in six targeted panchayats of Balangir, Nuapada, Bargarh, Kalahandi, Subarnapur and Boudh districts are being sensitised about the precautions they need to take at their workplace.The Western Odisha Migration Network, a civil society organisation, with support from organisations such as Aide et Action, Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women and Aaina are working on a database of women migrant worker leaders. They have also created a list of potential migrant women and adolescent girls. A register is being introduced in all these six panchayats to track migration of all age groups.No one to hear complaints“There have been a number of legal instruments to deal with sexual harassment in the informal sector. But workplaces in which poor workers work have no such complaint committee where grievances can be redressed,” said Umi Daniel, head of Migration Information and Resource Centre, Aide et Action, South Asia, and a prominent expert on migration issues.“If anything happens to women, they would suffer silently and come back. From discussions with migrant women workers, we came to know that every third woman has experienced some kind of harassment, including sexual assaults,” he said. “Now, we have started training 300 women. When these women go back to their workplace, they will talk to their peers. Important helpline numbers are being circulated among women workers for intimation in the event of an exigency. Women as dignified workers have the right to work in a non-exploitative environment outside the State and come back,” said Mr. Daniel.Of the hundreds of migrant women workers and adolescent girls, only a few have recently raised their voices and taken their sexual harassers to court.Around this time of the year, more than three lakh people from western Odisha districts migrate to Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and major towns of Odisha to work in brick kilns and the construction sector.last_img read more


first_imgA senior Gujarat BJP leader and former MLA Jayanti Bhanushali was shot dead by unidentified assailants when he was travelling from Kutch to Ahmedabad in Bhuj Dadar Express.He was apparently shot dead between Gandhidham and Surajbari stations in the neighbouring Kutch district, Morbi district’s SP Karanraj Vaghela said.“When the train reached Maliya station of Morbi, we recovered the body and sent it for post-mortem,” he said.Two bullets were fired at him that pierced his body, killing him on the spot. The police had also recovered empty bullet cartridges from the coach in which he was travelling. His personal loaded revolver was also found from his bag.Following his death, Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani ordered a high level probe to investigate the sensational murder of Mr Bhanushali, who courted several controversies including a case of rape and running a sex racket in Kutch.Mr Bhanushali was Abdasa legislator from 2007 to 2012 and subsequently became Kutch district BJP President and also Vice President of the state BJP.Last year, a 21-year-old college student in Surat had accusedMr Bhanushali of raping her multiple times. She said he had also filmed a vulgar video on the pretext of getting her admission to a fashion design college.Following the girl’s complaint, an FIR of rape and sexual harassment was lodged against Mr Bhanushali in Surat, forcing him to resign as the state BJP’s Vice President.However, in a curious turn of events, Gujarat High Court had quashed the FIR against him after the complainant backed out and withdrew her complaint stating that the same was filed in a fit of rage due to some personal misunderstanding between them.After his murder on Tuesday, his family members have lodged a case against his political rival and former legislator Chhabil Patel and four others, who allegedly conspired to get him murdered.last_img read more


first_imgThe Aizawl Bench of the Gauhati High Court on Tuesday rescheduled for January 29 the case against the extension of dry days in Mizoram.The Mizoram Liquor Dealers’ Association and owners of three bonded warehouses in the State filed lawsuits on January 17 against the Mizo National Front government’s decision to extend the dry days till March 10. Under pressure from the church and keeping its election promise to impose prohibition, the government had declared dry days from December 21 last to January 14 in view of Christmas and New Year celebrations. But the ban was extended earlier this month. More documents sought“The court, which had earlier asked the government to submit its dry day notifications, sought more documents,” one of the petitioners said.The owners of the bonded warehouses and the liquor outlets said the State government should have had an exit policy instead of extending the dry days “whimsically”. As there was no indication that the prohibition would be reintroduced, the dealers stocked up, placing orders till March, and incurred losses. Prohibition decisionsTotal prohibition was first imposed under the Mizoram Liquor (Total Prohibition) Act in 1997 when Lal Thanhawla was the Chief Minister. The decision, however, did not help the Congress retain power in the Assembly election the next year. The Congress replaced total prohibition with controlled prohibition 18 years later through the Mizoram Liquor (Prohibition and Control) Act, 2014. A few wine shops were opened in 2015, and the government netted ₹70 crore in annual revenue through liquor sales.last_img read more


first_imgGoa Tourism Minister Manohar Ajgaonkar on Wednesday formally acknowledged a drop in tourist arrivals in the State, at a meeting with industry stakeholders and agreed to address the issue by taking them on board.Travel and hospitality stakeholders are now expected to submit a comprehensive report on the issue in a month’s time, said Serafino Cota, who represents small and medium hoteliers on the coastal belt, after the meeting on Wednesday.“The problems will be looked into jointly by the Goa government after taking into confidence all the tourism bodies and stakeholders,” Mr. Ajgaonkar said. At the meeting, stakeholders led by president of the Travel and Tourism Association of Goa, Savio Messias, urged Mr. Ajgaonkar to address issues like harassment of tourists, nuisance caused by begging, unreasonable taxi charges by local operators, high rate of Goods and Services Tax, littering of beaches and unruly tourists drinking in public places. They also pointed out problems with the promotion and marketing strategy adopted by the State, leading to no returns in foreign tourist arrivals. Some stakeholders questioned the wisdom of indiscriminate road shows held abroad by the Ministry and failure to tap new markets, Mr. Cota said.Mr. Ajgaonkar, in turn, said that the Ministry would review the State’s marketing strategy by taking the stakeholders into confidence before drawing one to tap new markets. High cost of visas was also discussed, Mr. Cota said, but the Minister said the issue was in Centre’s domain.The Minister said he will take into consideration Mr. Cota’s suggestion that the State must come out with a partial subsidy of visa payment for foreign tourists, provided she/he stays in a registered hotel.last_img read more


first_imgGoa Director General of Police Muktesh Chander on Thursday cautioned against downloading content from Pakistan-based websites, which he said were compromised and trying to obtain user information.Mr. Chander, who is also a cybersecurity expert, was delivering a keynote address at a seminar on ‘Cyber Security for Industry’ in Panaji. “One cannot nab Pakistan-based elements who explode bombs in India and it is far more difficult to nab Pakistanis who indulge in copyright violation of music,” Mr. Chander said. Mr. Chander, who has served as Centre Director of the Cyber Division of National Technical Research Centre, which functions under the aegis of the Prime Minister’s Office, said that the songs.pk website promotes a compromised Chinese-made browser to glean information from a user’s phone. He also warned against excessive use of devices like Alexa and others promoted by Amazon and Google, because of their “potential to snoop on people’s lives.”last_img read more


first_imgThe chief mover and shaker for neuroscience at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is retiring.Neurobiologist Story Landis has spent 19 years at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), becoming its director in 2003 after 8 years as scientific director. She helped develop NIH programs for young investigators, coordinated neuroscience research across NIH, served as point person for human embryonic stem cell research, and steered an effort to improve the reproducibility of preclinical studies. Since last year, she has co-led NIH’s role in the federal brain-mapping project known as the BRAIN Initiative. As scientific director, Landis overhauled the institute’s intramural program. “I leave with a great sense of pride in what we were able to accomplish together,” she wrote in a farewell note to her staff.Earlier this year, Landis drew attention to the shrinking share of funding for basic research at NINDS. She worried that investigators mistakenly believed that her institute was more interested in disease-focused studies.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In a statement on 31 July, NIH Director Francis Collins called Landis “one of the true giants at the NIH” and “one of my closest advisors and ‘go-to’ leaders.” Eve Marder, a neuroscientist at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, and a member of NINDS’s advisory council, says Landis has been “a fabulous NINDS director.”Landis, 69, left academia for NIH in 1995. She plans to step down at the end of September and will join her husband in Maine. NINDS Deputy Director Walter Koroshetz will serve as acting NINDS director until her successor is chosen.last_img read more


first_imgChimpanzees have a sizable repertory of calls for the foods they love. Many of these sounds are grunts that the apes make when they’ve spotted, for example, figs or palm nuts, and that their fellow chimps understand. Scientists have debated whether the various grunts refer to specific foods, which would make the calls something like words in a human language. However, chimpanzees’ calls are considered to be largely fixed—meaning that unlike humans the apes are not vocal learners and cannot learn a new grunt by listening to the calls of others. Now, however, scientists recording the calls of two groups of captive adult chimpanzees have found that the apes can alter their sounds. The discovery occurred 3 years after seven adult chimpanzees (one shown in the photo above) from a safari park in the Netherlands were moved in with six other adults at Scotland’s Edinburgh Zoo in 2010. When given apples, the newcomers emitted loud, high-pitched calls (listen here). But the residents uttered softer grunts (listen here). Three years later, the immigrants’ calls had changed and sounded more like those of the Edinburgh apes (listen here). The altered grunts show that chimpanzee food calls are not as rigid as once thought, the scientists report online today in Current Biology. The researchers aren’t certain why the Dutch chimps changed their apple grunts, but they suspect that social forces were at play—either the arrivistes wanted to sound more like their new companions or to be better understood. The findings disprove the idea that chimpanzees cannot learn new sounds from their fellows, the scientists say. And that suggests that this ability—which is an important building block of human language—extends further back in time in our primate lineage than previously thought.last_img read more


first_imgSAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA—In 2006, South Africa’s future president Jacob Zuma said that he showered after sex to avoid HIV. The statement angered health experts and highlighted the country’s struggle to accurately communicate science. Thandi Mgwebi has spent the past 6 years trying to improve this communication. As executive director of research chairs and centers of excellence at the South African National Research Foundation (NRF), the largest government funder of science on the continent, she recruits international scientists and oversees the funding of their work. Yesterday, she participated in a panel here at the annual meeting of AAAS (which publishes Science) on “access to scientific expertise in fast growing African countries.” After the discussion, Mgwebi sat down with Science to talk about the obstacles to a better public understanding of science.Q: What’s the disconnect between science and the public in South Africa?A: We don’t have platforms [for communicating science] that are institutionalized. The people are there and they’ve got the will, but they don’t have the expertise to do it. They’re research scientists and they’re highly regarded, but in terms of communicating, that becomes a different ball game altogether. And then you get false stories [like Zuma’s statement about HIV]. Those kinds of stories are because of lack of communication and teaching. 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From the learned community of course it’s laughable, but you don’t know what’s happening in a local environment—in a village, for example. We don’t know how it affects education against sexually transmitted diseases, for example. It’s coming from a head of state. Obviously there must be some bad impact.Q: How do you combat that kind of misinformation?A: We’re trying to get all our scientists to be involved in one way or another in science writing, and the NRF has an internship program for young scientists in which the centers of excellence partner with science journalists. NRF also has a unit called SAASTA (South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement). They deal with science education, science awareness, and science communication.Q: How is the misunderstanding of science different in South Africa than in the United States?A: It’s the scale. I think the issues are the same, but the scale is different. There are also a lot of socioeconomic issues in Africa, and therefore approaches to help have to be different. Indigenous knowledge systems are very important in Africa. With the prevention of HIV, there were a lot of education initiatives, and most of them were aligned with what people believe. You have to look at the belief system, and not just come with your hardcore facts about science. I don’t think you’ve got that in the United States. If you do, it’s not at that scale.Check out our full coverage of the AAAS annual meeting.What message would you send into space? Tell us on Twitter and Vine with #msgtospace!last_img read more


first_imgThe parallel of India’s 157-year-old Section 377 of the Penal Code exists in Singapore as ‘Section 377A’ of the island-state’s Penal Code.The 377A criminalises sex between consenting adult men, but the law is not actively enforced. It was a colonial law left by the British.Read it at Connected to India Related Itemslast_img


first_imgThe next time you walk into a bookstore to browse English books penned by Indian authors, try this little game. Turn to the author biography to see which continent he currently calls home. If you are pondering established names on the literary scene, chances are that nine times out of ten, you will hit upon the phenomenon of the Indian English writer in self-imposed exile. What is it that makes the most talented of India’s literary geniuses steer clear of Indian shores to settle down in foreign lands? Is it the promise of fame, recognition and money that comes from catering to the western market with a much wider reader base? Or is it the ennui of having to pander to Indian readers, still far behind in terms of cultural and literary sophistication than their western counterparts? Or is it something much less sinister? Do these writers move away from the land that sparks their stories to achieve a heightened sense of intimacy and observation that distance is known to create?Or are we totally wrong about the causality? Perhaps the writers decide in favor of foreign lands for reasons not even remotely connected with their scribal calling. And perhaps we have as much talent at home as scattered all over the globe, and it is just the increased visibility rendered by the western marketing spotlight that beguiles us into believing otherwise.At least that is what Anita Desai would have us believe. In response to Nobel Prize winning author V.S. Naipaul’s allegation that Indian Writers in English (IWE’s) are responsible for creating a body of literature in exile mainly written by writers and read by readers living abroad, the US-based Desai (who has been nominated thrice for the Booker and who moved outside India only in her 50s when she was already an established author) said that it was not entirely true. In her opinion, English books have an international readership. Just  Anita Desailike IWE’s abroad who draw upon their international experiences to write books for the Indian migrant community, there are IWE’s back in India who may be little known elsewhere, but who concoct stories with a regional flavor for Indian readers.Desai’s reassurances however do not help when confronting the skewed ratio of prizes and honors claimed by Indian English writers in exile against those won by the writers living at home. The roster of Nobels, Bookers, Pulitzers, Whitbreds and Gillers shows the predominance of the former over the commercially marginalized latter. There is an occasional Arundhati Roy, but the promise soon dies out from lack of substantiation in the form of the emergence of other path-breaking native Indian writers in English.In an interview with William Dalrymple prior to the release of the Booker-winning The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy pointed out the chasm between her and her contemporaries, who mostly belong to the young emerging breed of Doon School and Oxbridge University educated writers preferring to live outside India. Altaf Tyrewala, the author of No God In Sight, avers that he cannot imagine himself living in the First World and writing about the Third, traveling for a month or so to India to gather material on which to base his writing. In doing so, Tyrewala acknowledges the existence of other writers who do so. Tishani Doshi, author of The Pleasure Seekers holds a similar opinion on the issue of Indian writers residing abroad while writing a work of fiction based in the subcontinent – that it makes the process difficult and the writing stilted.To counter the mud-slinging by the natives, the IWE’s abroad resort to drastic measures. Burdened by being tagged an IWE, they much  Shashi Tharoorprefer to steer clear of their Indian roots and limit the references of Indianness only in their works. Hari Kunzru, author of The Impressionist and Transmission claims that he is not an Indian writer but a British one, thus categorically denying any claim that Indians may make of him being an IWE. There is no way of arguing against Kunzru’s stand, especially when we erroneously claim foreign authors writing about India such as Mark Tully, Dominique Lapierre and William Dalrymple as our own, as well as Indian writers settled abroad like Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Vikram Seth, Hari Kunzru and the Desais.The feeling of alienation is only heightened when Indians fail to appreciate literature on the home turf, looking towards the West for ratification of genuine talent flourishing in India. At a reception organized at Santiniketan to pay homage to Rabindranath Tagore’s literary genius after he had been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, Tagore said, “The insult and infamy that was my lot to suffer at the hands of my country were not inconsiderable in quantity and so long I had borne them with patience. In this context, I have not been able to understand clearly why I received honor from outside. I did not know that God, whom I had offered homage sitting on the Eastern shore, would extend his right arm in the western shore to accept the same… Europe has given me the garland of honor. If it carries any value, it lies in the aesthetic sense of the men of culture of that country. That has no connection with our country.” It is perhaps the only recorded incident when Tagore lost his innate sense of courtesy and self-control. Coming from a person who has been regarded for over a century as the first person to put India on the literary map of the  Hari Kunzruworld, Tagore’s words speak tons for the double standards in Indian literary taste and for a nation’s failure to recognize its literary geniuses until and unless they bear the western stamp of approval. It is no wonder that most Indian English writers prefer to chalk the journey of their literary stardom away from homeland.From the times of Dean Mahomed who emigrated to Ireland in 1786 to make a living out of shampooing and bathing parlors and ended up penning the first English book by an Indian author Travels of Dean Mahomed, in 1794, umpteen Indian writers have looked westward for literary success. When Raja Rao, Nirad Chaudhari and R. K. Narayan embarked on their careers as fiction writers, they all showed great promise. While we remember Chaudhari and Narayan as doyens of Indian English writing, Sahitya Akademi Award winner Raja Rao today remains largely forgotten, because he lived and wrote in India and his books were published by Indian publishing houses. The low recognition for Rao’s works in today’s world of hefty advances and book launches is all the more conspicuous when we consider the exuberance of the praise lavished on Rao by legenadry British playright and novelist Lawrence Durell: “You not only do India great honor, but you have honored English literature by writing in our language… truly magnificent… work by which an age can measure itself, its values.” Clearly, the world of literary success does not offer a level playing field between Indian native and émigré writers.The reasons why Indian English writers prefer to live abroad are varied. Residing in the west offers easy access to publishers, agents and even other writers of a similar bent of mind with whom they can discuss their books, work and other things. It lends them a sense of comradeship that helps dispel the feeling of loneliness during the long years that a book can take. Writers who have lived and written in India, such as Anita Desai, often lament the lonely lives that writers must endure, with the absence of western conventions like critique groups and writers’ meets that writers abroad have access to. Though the trend is catching up in India, it still is long before writers can find support in this country.There is another desirable reason for Indian writers to migrate to the Occident. Living abroad is also the way that Indian writers in English learn the objective exactitude, the critical sharpness and the universal essence of world literature, something that cannot be imbibed by reading the works alone. It helps them write about India in a quintessential and objective manner, unforgiving of the preoccupations and foibles that writers in India might fail to deem important enough to be captured. Amit Chaudhuri, who is one of the three judges for this year’s Man Booker Literary Prize, says: “For me, the position of the outsider is of great importance to the health of any society. My anxiety is that in the last 20 years, India, typically for a globalizing country, hasn’t theorized a position for the outsider or for the misfit or for failure. Its rhetoric is concerned with success in various ways. In India, everybody is some way in some kind of nexus of power. We need to regain that space for the irresponsible.” And what better way to seek that elusive vantage point than to move away from the nexus and observe it with a dispassioned eye.The feeling of exile in being transplanted from one continent to another has played a major role in shaping some of the best names in Indian English writing, such as Salman Rushdie, Kiran Desai and Jhumpa Lahiri. Perhaps no one understands this better than Amitava Kumar, author of Away: The Indian Writer As An Expatriate and Bombay-London-New York, two books that lend a fresh personal perspective on Indian writing in English in the context of exile. On the tricky issue of whether it is justified to treat Indian writers in English as a single genre, he opined, “My interest is in identifying the ways in which movement or  Kiran Desaimigration has been a part of our narratives. And it is fascinating to see how Indians are carriers of an elsewhere whether this elsewhere is the reality of a small town or a village preserved in the space of an Indian metropolis or in a Western metropolis like London or New York.”The multiculturalism evident in the works of émigré Indian writers is a result of the alienation they have suffered from both cultures, Indian and western, and their struggle to bridge the gap between the two. It is often because of the distance these writers must contend with between themselves and the milieu of their stories that a certain longing and sentimentality often creeps into their works. Though this element of nostalgia has often been debunked by the critics, it may well be seen as the hallmark of an emerging class of Indian writers.Whatever the reasons, the exile has done more good than harm to the Indian literary scene, with publishing houses and literary agencies setting up base in India, in recognition of the growing importance of Indian writing in the global scene. The press has been flooded for some years now with stories of major publishing houses like Penguin, HarperCollins and Random House flocking to India in expectation of a literary boom in the country. This in turn has helped many English writers living in India find good publishers and recognition for their work.At present, the flight of the Indian writer to foreign lands is more a rule than an exception. And looking at the growing number of Indian writers choosing to populate the western literary firmament rather than the Indian one, this trend is only going to strengthen.   *Article corrected on 7/20/08  V. S. Naipaul  Raja Roy  Jhumpa Lahiri Related Itemslast_img read more